The Toowoomba House


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105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_main.jpg
The Grange, 105 Jellicoe Street, North Toowoomba, Qld circa 1890


This material is a summary of published work by the Heritage Advisory Group of the Toowoomba City Council

More Information: Toowoomba’s Heritage Treasures 2008


Introduction

To identify Toowoomba city’s main heritage styles, eight typical Toowoomba house styles are considered and some good examples mentioned.
Tombonda,_43_Jellicoe_Street.jpg

The Eight Styles


  • In Queensland the variety of architectural styles is less than in the older, richer and more populous southern States.
  • In consequence, it works well to talk of Toowoomba’s heritage houses as belonging to one or other of just eight styles.
These styles fall into the following two main groups:
  1. The Early Toowoomba House, 1890 to 1918
  2. The Bungalow, 1920s and 1930s

The Early Toowoomba House, 1890 to 1918


1. The Colonial House

The quintessential early Queensland house,
  • usually symmetrical and with generous, Georgian-derived proportions,
  • spacious verandas,
  • pyramidal roof
  • and central hall.104_Herries_Street,_built_1879.jpg

Good examples include:
  • 15 Boulton Terrace, 1896
  • 86 Campbell Street, (east veranda, 1995)
  • 181 Geddes Street
  • 10 Hampshire Street, 1907 (side verandas, 1991)
  • Bonnie Doon, 74 Herries Street, 1893
  • 104 Herries Street, 1879
  • 107 Herries Street
  • 14 Sir Street, c.1890, renovated 1996
  • Te Hoa, 84 Campbell Street, c.1900

2. The Cottage

Similar to the Colonial House—
  • pyramidal roof and front veranda,
  • symmetrical and with a central hall—but smaller. 67_Herries_Street,_built_1897_or_1898.jpg
  • It was the typical, modest, early house of our towns.

Good examples include:
  • 10 Burns Street, 1910, restored 1983
  • 11 Eleanor Street
  • 21 French Street, 1900s
  • 67 Herries Street, 1897 or 1898
  • 12 Kenneth Street
  • 184 Perth Street, 1900, (side veranda is recent)
  • 203 South Street
  • 210 South Street
  • Chelsea, 1 Warren Street
  • 7 Warren Street, 1907

3. The Early Gabled House

Often quite similar to the Cottage but
  • more elaborate and larger, sometimes much more so,
  • and with one projecting front room with a decorated gable.

Good examples include:
  • 16 Argyle Street
  • Bronnington, 52 Bridge Street, 1910, restored 1987-926_Garget_Street,_built_1913.jpg
  • Kanowna, 174 Bridge Street, 1905 or ’06, restored 1996
  • 12 Burns Street, 1910, restored 1997
  • 53 Campbell Street
  • 7 Cooper Street
  • 6 Garget Street, 1913
  • 8 Godfrey Street
  • 1 Joffre Street
  • 11 Kenneth Street, 1911
  • Cronulla, 135 Mary Street
  • Braidwood, 61 Phillip Street
  • 3 Shipley Street
  • 18 Stephen Street
  • 9 Warren Street

4. The Larger Early House

  • Greater area, more features,
  • decoration and veranda, and
  • sometimes architect-designed. Apsley,_120_Mary_Street,_built_1907.jpg
  • No two houses are likely to be the same. This division is not really a style as such houses tended to follow one of several.

Good examples include:
  • 24 Anzac Avenue, 1906
  • Crana, 23 Arthur Street
  • Hamilton, 50 Campbell Street, c. 1890
  • Claremont, 91 Campbell Street, c. 1905
  • Berwyn, 3 Cecil Street, c. 1902-6
  • Endlich, now Edinglassie, 32 Crown Street, 1911 or 1912
  • 89 Jellicoe Street, 1910
  • The Grange, 105 Jellicoe Street, 1890s
  • Apsley, 120 Mary Street, 1907
  • Rothesay, 91 Lindsay Street, 1905
  • 1 Moloney Street
  • 74 Phillip Street
  • Carningli, 67 West Street, 1914

5. The Federation House

In the years before the Great War, a new, more decorative style appeared with
  • splendid carpenter’s flourishes and Brentford,_97_Herries_Street,_built_1913.jpg
  • stained glass.
  • Window proportions become more elongated and casements (windows hinged on the side) were favoured.

Good examples include:
  • Cavell Cottage, 25 Cavell Street
  • 3 Cox Street
  • 255 Geddes Street
  • Brentford, 97 Herries Street, 1913
  • 13 and 15 Isabel Street
  • Repertory Theatre, 94 Margaret Street
  • Valetta, 96 Margaret Street, c.1910
  • Pikedale, 60 Mary Street, 1916
  • 149-151 Russell Street, corner of West Street

The Bungalow, 1920s and 1930s



6. The Queensland Bungalow

  • The State’s own new Twentieth Century house, quite unlike the earlier styles,
  • now without a central passage and
  • with an asymmetrical gabled front.43_Wirra_Wirra_Street.jpg
Most followed similar patterns, often taken from State design booklets.

Good examples include:
  • 307 Bridge Street, 1934, (a 1926 State Design)
  • 15 Campbell Street, 1925
  • 184 Campbell Street
  • 12 Christmas Street
  • 26 Crown Street
  • 127 Hill Street
  • 1 Kingston Street
  • 1 Lydwin Crescent
  • 35 Margaret Street
  • 9 Somme Street, 1936
  • 109 Taylor Street, c.1934
  • 43 Wirra Wirra Street

7. The Custom Bungalow

  • Bungalows individually designed in the Queensland style.
  • They were usually a little larger,
  • more ambitious in detail, 23A_Arthur_Street,_built_in_1936.jpg
  • with more decoration than the pattern book houses and
  • sometimes architect-designed.

Good examples include:
  • 54 Anzac Avenue, c. 1927
  • 23A Arthur Street, 1936
  • 13 Campbell Street
  • 54 Campbell Street
  • 32 Colvin Street, Drayton, 1935
  • 46 Eleanor Street
  • 15 Glennie Street, Drayton, 1929
  • 117 Herries Street
  • 73 Mary Street, 1917 and later
  • 123 Jellicoe Street, 1930
  • 29 Margaret Street, 1926
  • 52 Phillip Street, c.1923
  • 204 Spring Street, Middle Ridge

8. The Bungalow along Southern Lines

The bungalow was handled a little differently in the southern States and some people preferred to follow one of those styles.
Montrose,_49_Margaret_Street,_built_1929-30.jpg
  • Melbourne’s widely-read monthly The Home Beautiful was probably quite influential.

Good examples include:
  • Pine Lodge, 85 Campbell Street
  • 93 Campbell Street
  • Padauk, 104 Campbell Street
  • Casa Mara, 77 Campbell Street
  • 63 Cranley Street
  • 237 Geddes Street, 1936
  • 208 Herries Street, 1926
  • Tombonda, 43 Jellicoe Street, corner of Mary Street, 1932
  • Montrose, 49 Margaret Street, 1929-30
  • 67 Margaret Street
  • 260 Margaret Street, c. 1922


The Grange circa 1890 irreplaceable history!

105 Jellicoe Street, North Toowoomba, Qld 4350

For Sale - $595,000
105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_main.jpg
The Grange circa 1890

An historic residence built circa 1890 by the sister in law of one of Toowoomba's most famous early residents (James Taylor), this landmark property has been admired by all who pass her by.

Originally located on acreage extending back to North Street and down to where the railway was later to run, this traditional Queensland early colonial is now perfectly perched on an elevated 1002m2 allotment overlooking the surrounding suburb and located within walking distance to the thriving central business district.

Wide verandahs and original character features create an appealing street frontage, while inside the endearing traditional era specific features, including 12 foot pressed metal ceilings, VJ walls, cedar doors and fireplaces blend tastefully and timelessly.

Over 120 years on, this picture perfect character home radiates a timeless elegance and will continue to provide an enchanting place to call home' for many generations to come. It is a privilege to present this iconic property for your consideration.
  • Formal and informal living areas
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image3.jpg
  • Floor length sash windows to verandah
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image4.jpg
  • Large bay window, ornate ceiling roses
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image2.jpg
  • Functional kitchen including island bench
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image5.jpg
  • Office with access to large attic
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image6.jpg
  • Wisteria covered northern pergola
    105_Jellicoe_Street,_North_image8.jpg
  • Restumped, rewired, new plumbing
  • Well established gardens including mature walnut tree