Historic Buildings listed by the Tasmanian National Trust

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Table of Contents

Georgian and Gothic Revival Style buildings forming the Heritage of Tasmania.


Been thinking about a trip to Tasmania? You're not alone. The number of international tourists visiting Tasmania has increased more than in any other part of the country. A tourism boss in the state says momentum has been building for years and now "it is just our time".

Highlights:

  1. Which imposing house was the biggest inn between Hobart and Launceston?
  2. Where is the oldest bridge in Australia?
  3. What was made by Joseph Moir's unique factory?
  4. Where is the Hobart house which is National Trust listed, but NOT on the Australian Heritage Register?
  5. Where is a surviving cottage built as early as 1824?
  6. Which old dignified Tasmanian Georgian house is named for its trees?
  7. Which National Trust WINNING property is neither on the Tasmanian Heritage Register NOR the Australian Heritage Register??
  8. Where is the favourite summer retreat of Tasmanian Governors which was demolished, but parts of it are still heritage registered?
  9. Where are Tudor-Gothic architectural examples in Tasmania?
  10. Where is the heritage-registered whiskey distillery in Tasmania?
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Lake House TAS (1830)
Shene Estate TAS (1851)
Redlands TAS (1825)
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Clifton Priory (1848)
Conjoined houses St John Street Launceston (1853)

Dysart House, Kempton (1842)
  • "The National Trust in Tasmania has a Classification knowledge base for heritage listing in Tasmania (which) work has been carried out by the organisation for 45 years with 4,850 listings on the National Trust register up to 1998.
  • "Records of this database were provided to the Tasmanian Heritage Council in Tasmania, for no fee, as the starting point for the Tasmanian Heritage Council register."
  • "The (Tasmanian Heritage) Register contained 5,277 pro rata listings - when compared with other states Tasmania holds the most quantity of heritage sites worthy of registration for classification and heritage protection." - PRODUCTIVITY COMMISSION SUBMISSION 2005
  • This list has been rescinded by the Tasmanian Government.

1- 27 of the 106 Properties listed in 1964 by the Tasmanian National Trust

An Historic Buildings competition was held in Tasmania during the latter half of 1963 and early 1964.
  • The success and wide-spread interest in the competition prompted the publication of the book:
  • Priceless Heritage: Historic Buildings of Tasmania by the National Trust of Australia (Tasmanian branch) Platypus Publications 1964.
  • NLA Listing: Available in the National Library of Australia collection. Format: Book; 136p. : chiefly ill. ; 28cm
  • More about the Book Priceless Heritage: Historic Buildings of Tasmania

The Mercury Historic Homes Competition

  • This photographic competition was held in 1963 to mark the 109th anniversary of the founding of the Mercury newspaper.
  • The competition was sponsored by The Mercury and organised by the National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) southern region.
The competition had 6 classes:
  1. Best preserved town or country house in Tasmania
  2. Best preserved place of worship
  3. Best maintained privately owned but open to the public property (eg hotel, school, shop)
  4. Best maintained commercial or rural building (eg factory, warehouse, barn)
  5. Best preserved country house for each House of Assembly electorate
  6. Best maintained public building

Which Were the Winners?

  • Category 1 "Best preserved town or country house in Tasmania":
    Conjoined Houses 169-171 St John Street, Launceston
  • Category 2 "Best preserved or restored" place of worship in Tasmania:
    St Andrews Presbyterian Church High Street Evandale, TAS, Australia
  • Category 3 "Best maintained privately owned house open to the public"
    Summerhome, 2 Hopkins Street, Moonah, TAS
  • Category 4. "Best maintained commercial or rural building"
    161 Davey Street, Hobart
  • Category 6 "Best maintained public building" or entitled by The Mercury as the "best restored and preserved building"
    The Queen Mary Club, Macquarie Street, Hobart
Note: The Tasmanian National Trust does not now maintain a publicly available list of Tasmanian Heritage
  • This list hopes to remedy that situation by republishing the properties featured in the Competition:
  • These 106 heritage properties are listed in the order they were featured in the book, Priceless Heritage: Historic Buildings of Tasmania, published by Platypus Publications and text and photos by the National Trust of Tasmania. - buy it here
  • Most Title links are to the Australian Heritage Database; Properties below are also linked to their own websites if they exist.
  • Some black and white photographs are from the ehive account of the National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) Franklin House 413 Hobart Rd Launceston Tasmania 7250, Australia (Only black and white images are published in the book)
  • While Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID Numbers are shown, no further information is immediately available from Heritage Tasmania unless you enquire by Address or Building ID to enquiries@heritage.tas.gov.au.
Convict Labour
Convicts in Port Arthur carrying a long log on their shoulders during fence construction.
Convicts in Port Arthur carrying a long log on their shoulders during fence construction.

Government view:

The colony of Van Diemen's Land was established in its own right in 1827 and officially became known as Tasmania in 1856.
In the 50 years from 1803–1853 around 75,000 convicts were transported to Tasmania.
By 1835 there were over 800 convicts working in chain-gangs at the infamous Port Arthur penal station, which operated between 1830 and 1877.

The role of convicts in shaping the landscape and social fabric of Tasmania’s Heritage Highway region is a story of hardship and survival.

Uni of Tasmania view:

A convict being flogged in Van Diemen's Land
A convict being flogged in Van Diemen's Land

More than 90% of the convicts to Van Diemen’s Land were part of the Assignment system.
  • Toiling on farms and in domestic situations, road gangs and other government infrastructure projects, the skills and labour, and many highly skilled trades of the assigned convicts was a cheap workforce that enabled many landowners to build grand estates and prosper, as well as the roads and bridges that opened up the interior of Tasmania. Theirs is a lasting legacy.
  • Read more at Uni of Tasmania

  • Approximately 162,000 convicts were sent to Australia, often for the most petty of crimes, were treated as slave labour, and received the harshest of treatment. Norfolk Island, in particular, dished out harsh and inhumane punishment.
  • Even the transportation to Australia constituted a major punishment in itself. Whilst conditions on the First Fleet have been described as fairly satisfactory, 267 convicts died during the voyage of the Second Fleet, and 199 in the Third Fleet.
  • Captain Hill, a British military officer at that time, wrote of the awful conditions in the convict fleets. Read more at Ironbark Resources

1. Lake House 599 Delmont Road, Cressy, TAS, Australia

Lake House is a magnificently restored Georgian Home, circa 1830, set in a 1400 acre Estate on the banks of the Macquarie and Lake Rivers with panoramic views across the Tasmanian Midlands Valley to the Western Tiers and Ben Lomond to the east.
  • Lake House is now a two-storey, 5 star, luxurious home in Tasmania with 6 king size bedrooms, each with large adjoining ensuites. Two further bedrooms adjoining the home, each with en-suites to facilitate more guests or to be used for a clients own personnel.
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Lake House
Lake House

Lake House
Lake House

The house was built for settler Robert Corney, who first occupied Lake Farm in 1821.
  • Corney drowned soon after it was finished in 1830, while fording the river with an oxcart.
  • The Corney family remained in the house for another 30 years, with an 1842 census showing 16 people living at Lake House, 10 of whom were convicts.
  • Lake House had been partially preserved and made habitable by the previous owner, Bruce Wall, who acquired the dilapidated property in a soldier settlement scheme ballot in the 1940s.

Heritage architect David Denman was engaged to guide the renovation of Lake House.
  • “The original layout of the house turned its back on the river,” Mr Denman says. To establish a connection with the river, he designed two new conservatory wings that extend from the rear of the house. Windows from a French monastery were used in the conservatories, and local glaziers and tradesmen built new windows and French doors to match. New timber was matched to the Australian cedar in the original part of the house.

Lake House is an excellent example of austere and dignified Georgian architecture in imitation of a classical villa.
  • The detail of the building is extremely simple, in contrast to the archaeologically correct Greek Doric porch which suggests a pattern book origin.
  • The house is in excellent condition and occupies a fine commanding position on the western bank of the Macquarie River.

The striking Georgian dwelling is the centrepiece of a 490-hectare irrigated pastoral and cropping property, about 50 kilometres south of Launceston.
  • But for the first time since it was built by Van Diemen’s Land convict labour in the late 1820s, using bricks fired on the property, it is the appeal of the home, rather than merely the value of the farm and livestock that will determine its market value.
  • Mr Sherrard says he initially planned Lake House to become a country hotel, but instead he moved in and raised his daughters there.
  • Each of the six bedrooms in the main house has en suite bathroom with a matching custom-made bathtub carved from a single block of marble.
  • The basement level was restored and extended.[1]
River of dreams: Tasmania’s Lake House embraces heritage
River of dreams: Tasmania’s Lake House embraces heritage
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A severe Regency villa completed before 1842 - more about Regency architectural style

Cressy, Tasmania


Cressy is a small town 35 kilometres (22 mi) south-west of Launceston, Tasmania.
Cressy Post Office opened on 17 September 1856.[2]

Town of Cressy

Cressy is a rural township with a population of around 1000 is on the Norfolk Plains, below the Great Western Tiers, 36 kms from Launceston, and 21 kms off the Midlands Highway.
  • Cressy was built as the main centre for the Cressy Company. It was named by the first company director Captain Bartholemew Boyle Thomas, a descendant of a war hero at the battle of ‘Crecy’ in the fourteenth century. The company was named after this battle.
  • The Cressy Company, also known as ‘The Cressy Establishment’, was a large agricultural company. The company owned a significant portion of the Norfolk Plains including land from the Lake River to the Liffey River.
  • William Brumby built the first building in the area, the Cressy Hotel, in 1845.
  • Cressy did not become an official town ship until 1848.
  • The Cressy area is a mecca for fly fishing. Known as the 'Gateway to Trout Fishing Paradise' with accessibility to Brumby's Creek, the Weirs, the Macquarie Lake and Liffey rivers.
  • Cressy is Tasmania's only 'troutified' township and home to the well known,Tasmanian Trout Expo which is held annually


2. Shene Stables RA 76 Shene Road, Pontville, TAS, Australia

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Shene Stables
Shene Stables

Shene Stables
Shene Stables

An outstanding and unique stone stables contrived by Francis Butler and his father Gamaliel Butler as a romantic, picturesque composition.
It is a notable example of a Victorian Gothic building influenced by pattern books, which makes a memorable impact in the landscape.

Historic Town of Pontville

Pontville is located in Tasmania
Pontville is located in Tasmania

Pontville is a small rural community 28 kilometres (17 mi) north of Hobart, in the south-east of Tasmania, Australia. At the 2006 census, Pontville had a population of 2,166.

Pontville was sited by Governor Lachlan Macquarie, in 1821, and was an early garrison town, where convicts built the bridge over the Jordan River. During World Wars I and II the area had a major army camp.

There is an old sandstone bridge in Pontville that lies on the Jordan River. The bridge is part of the Midland Highway.

A railway line connected the town with Hobart from 1891 until 1947. Additional excursion trains operated from Hobart, bringing riflemen to the nearby range.

Pontville, Tasmania

The scenic riverside settlement of Pontville is rich in heritage and natural attractions. Located near Brighton, just north of Hobart, Pontville sits on a hill overlooking the Jordan River on one side and a vast plain on the other that was once an Aboriginal travelling route between Tasmania's north and south.
Church turned to Restaurant in Pontville
Church turned to Restaurant in Pontville

  • The site was established as a garrison town in 1821 and boomed in the early days for its timber, quarries and proximity to the hunting grounds of the Southern Midlands, which had been fire-stick farmed over thousands of years by Aboriginal Tasmanians.
  • As one of Tasmania's oldest settlements, Pontville offers plenty of history to explore with several churches and cemeteries as well as the ruins of the first shops and garrison buildings. There are many fine Georgian residences, an old pub and heritage accommodation on the banks of the Jordan River.
  • For an insight into Tasmania's colonial heritage, visit Shene homestead (1819), a 19th century country estate

Pontville was sited by Governor Lachlan Macquarie, in 1821, and was an early garrison town, where convicts built the bridge over the Jordan River.
  • During World Wars I and II the area had a major army camp.
  • There is an old sandstone bridge in Pontville that lies on the Jordan River. The bridge is part of the Midland Highway.
A railway line connected the town with Hobart from 1891 until 1947. Additional excursion trains operated from Hobart, bringing riflemen to the nearby range.[2]


3. Bowood, Bridport Road, Bridport, TAS, Australia

Open Gardens Australia: "Bowood" at Bridport:
Open Gardens Australia: "Bowood" at Bridport:

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Halfway house between George Town and Cape Portland. It was built in 1835 of slate stone and hand made bricks. The house is surrounded by gardens and English trees.
Bowood is a Victorian Georgian style house, c1844, with kitchen wing, two large store rooms, and related garden.

Town of Bridport


Bridport, Tasmania

Bridport is a popular beachside holiday destination, famous for its white sandy beaches, coastal parks and bushland reserves, and Barnbougle Dunes – one of the world's best public golf courses and Australia's number one.
Barnbougle Dunes – one of the world's best public golf courses
Barnbougle Dunes – one of the world's best public golf courses

  • Overlooking Anderson Bay, Bridport offers excellent river and sea fishing, bushwalking and beach activities.
  • Relax into the holiday spirit of Bridport in summer where there's no shortage of summertime fun and fresh seafood to enjoy. In fact, alfresco dining on local scallops, lobster and trout from Australia's first freshwater rainbow trout farm is a year-round pastime.
  • The Bridport Wildflower Reserve in the Granite Point Conservation Area bursts into vibrant colour in spring with spectacular wildflower displays and feeding birds.
  • Other nearby reserves have spectacular coastal views, waterfalls, white sand dunes and native wildlife.

4. Macquarie House 17 Church Street, Ross, TAS, Australia

"Tasmania has an excess of beautiful and fascinating 19th Century colonial towns.
  • "Of all the early 19th Century towns, there is nothing quite the equal of Ross.
  • "The secret is that the Midland Highway (the main route between Hobart and Launceston) by-passes Ross thus preserving the original, sleepy character of the town.
  • "Macquarie House and Store dates from the 1840s. It now contains a fine collection of military memorabilia dating from 1800 including both Australian and foreign military equipment, uniforms, vehicles etc". The Age, Melbourne 2004
Macquarie House
Macquarie House
Macquarie House
Macquarie House

An excellent example of a late Georgian townhouse with its shorter facade to the street.
This facade is of three bays with a fine off centre entrance comprising a six panel door and transom light surmounted by a cornice with large bracket scrolls.
An early iron railing assists the building in making a major contribution to the townscape of Ross.

5. The Courtyard of Redlands & Outbuildings 759 Glenora Road, Plenty, TAS, Australia

Cobbled Courtyard, 'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania
Cobbled Courtyard, 'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania




'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania.
'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania.



Photos from National Trust of Australia (Tasmania)

Cobbled Courtyard, 'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania. Built 1825
'Redlands', Plenty, Tasmania. Built 1825
Redlands & Outbuildings 759 Glenora Rd, Plenty, TAS
Redlands & Outbuildings 759 Glenora Rd, Plenty, TAS

Redlands & Outbuildings
Redlands & Outbuildings

Redlands & Outbuildings
Redlands & Outbuildings

A very unusual house of Georgian and vernacular origins. The first part of the house was built in 1825 and in the next 50 years grew significantly, to include in time, attached workers' cottages, brick outbuilding (also attached) and octagonal brick hop kiln.
The rear courtyard which is cobbled and the surrounding cottages is perhaps the most memorable part of a complex attached group.
Redlands & Outbuildings
Redlands & Outbuildings

Redlands & Outbuildings
Redlands & Outbuildings

Village of Plenty


Plenty, Tasmania

Redlands, on the banks of the Plenty River alongside the famous Salmon Ponds in the Derwent Valley, is one of Tasmania’s most well-known rural estates. Once a thriving hop and grain farm, the estate contains an astonishing collection of heritage buildings and magnificent gardens featuring some of Australia’s oldest European trees.
  • The property has a remarkable history, with many overlays of stories from its convict past to modern times. There are intriguing links to the royal family and the emergence of colonial Tasmania’s new-landed elite, our first banks, the development of trout fisheries and irrigation, and the property also holds a primary place in Tasmania’s hop farming history.
  • At its peak the farm employed as many as 200 hop pickers with their families living on the estate, and many Tasmanians still hold fond memories of working at picking hops. In those days there were pickers’ huts, a bakehouse, general store and even a butcher’s shop. Only one of the pickers’ huts has survived but most of the other buildings are intact, though in disrepair.
  • Now, after years of decline and neglect, the property has undergone a modern transformation as a family residence, working farm, whisky distillery and tourism development.

6. Eardley-Wilmot Tomb, St. David's Park, Hobart

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Sir John Eardley Eardley – Wilmot was born in England on 21 February 1783. He was educated at Harrow and was called to the bar in 1806 and was created a baronet in 1821.
He was a member of the House of Commons for some years and in March 1843, was appointed lieutenant-governor of Tasmania, and arrived at Hobart on 17 August.
In April 1846 Wilmot was recalled. The official statements relating to his recall were of the vaguest character, such as that he had not shown "an active care of the moral interests involved in the system of convict discipline".
Privately Gladstone, the new colonial secretary, informed Wilmot that he was not recalled for any errors in his official character, but because rumours reflecting on his moral character had reached the colonial office.
from http://ontheconvicttrail.blogspot.com.au/2014/08/governor-eardley-wilmots-grave-site.html
  • An elaborate Gothic tomb built in 1850 for one of the two Lieutenant-Governors of Van Diemen's Land to die in the Colony.
  • Possibly part of Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #2288
  • More about Victorian Georgian style - top of page

7. Salamanca Place, Hobart

  • Listed on the Register of the National Estate - see separate references below
Salamanca Place is a precinct of Hobart, the capital city of the state of Tasmania.
  • Salamanca Place itself consists of rows of sandstone buildings, formerly warehouses for the port of Hobart Town that have since been converted into restaurants, galleries, craft shops and offices.
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  • Each Saturday, Salamanca Place is the site for Salamanca Market, which is popular with tourists and locals. The markets are ranked as one of the most popular tourist attractions visited each year
    File:SalamancaPlace2008.jpg
    File:SalamancaPlace2008.jpg
Warehouses
Warehouses

Warehouses
Warehouses

A unified group of late Georgian warehouses of consistent design but in various condition. The buildings contribute considerably to the historic and townscape appeal of Salamanca Place.
Superb group of stone Colonial warehouses possibly the last and undoubtedly the best group of waterfront Georgian warehouses remaining in Australia. Once the centre for trade and commerce in Hobart.
  • The finest row of early merchant warehouses in Australia; most date from the 1840s.
  • Warehouses 21-33 Salamanca Place Hobart - Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #1928, #1930, #1931, #1932
  • Warehouses 47-89 Salamanca Place HobartTasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #1935, #1938, #1942, #1944, #1952, #1954
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  • More about Victorian Georgian style - top of page

8. Waddow 11 Brisbane Street, Launceston, TAS, Australia

Waddow
Waddow

Two storey brick Victorian house. Bluestone footings. Iron hip roof.
  • Two storey verandah with twin timber columns, cast iron brackets, valences and balustrades.
  • Large two pane windows onto verandah with panels below and full length shutters. Side windows have sun hoods.
  • Bay window on west side. Bracketed eaves.
  • Decorative corbels on chimneys.
  • Side (east) entry portico stucco in imitation of ashlar.
  • Beautiful garden with mature trees.

The house has an elegant two storey verandah, fine portico and beautiful garden with mature plantings.

The building and garden are essential elements of the Launceston townscape.
A fine intact example of a two storey Victorian residence built about 1870.
- top of page

9. Conjoined Houses 169-171 St John Street, Launceston

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  • Constructed in 1850-3, the building and its immediate neighbours provide a fine streetscape.
  • Restoration would be possible with the removal of dormer windows, window hoods, and the later wing added to the northern end of the building
Conjoined Townhouses
Conjoined Townhouses
Conjoined Townhouses
Conjoined Townhouses
Large two storey stuccoed brick, conjoined townhouses with cellars below and attics in roof space. Roof hipped with projecting boxed eaves. Windows are twelve pane double hung sashes with lugsills.
Original shutters missing from all windows and Victorian window hoods have been added to upper windows. On base of imitation ashlar ending in a string course. Houses have side entrance porches of imitation ashlar, six panelled front doors with quarter round columns at sides and elliptical fanlights over.
165 - 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania.; Unknown; 1971;
165 - 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania.; Unknown; 1971;
Dining room in 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania.; Lloyd, Brian; c. 1970s;
Dining room in 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania.; Lloyd, Brian; c. 1970s;
Georgian houses at 165 - 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania
Dining room of 171 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania. In the 1970s this room was known as the gold room because of it's gold wallpaper. It was furnished with oriental and English-Chinese style pieces.

Launceston, Tasmania



Launceston, Tasmania

Aerial view of Launceston
Aerial view of Launceston

Launceston is Tasmania's second major city and a vibrant hub for food and wine, culture and nature. In fact, the whole region is packed with city and country charm, gorgeous old towns, excellent food and wine and beautiful scenic highlights.
  • One of Australia's oldest cities, Launceston has one of the best-preserved early cityscapes in Australia with its elegant Colonial and Victorian architecture and century-old parks.
  • Just a short walk from the city centre, Cataract Gorge is a slice of wilderness right in the heart of town and Launceston's star natural attraction.
  • There's also plenty of culture on offer at art galleries, museums and design studios. The Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery is the largest regional gallery in Australia.
  • And for a little 'home away from home', why
    Launceston, Paterson Street in Rainy Weather in 2014
    Launceston, Paterson Street in Rainy Weather in 2014
    not catch a game of AFL at Aurora Stadium?
  • From Launceston, you can follow the Tamar River north through Tasmania's premium wine-growing region, past forested hills and farmland, lavender fields, vineyards, orchards and pretty riverside towns.
  • Historic villages are found around every corner, from Longford on the outskirts of Launceston to Evandale, Ross and Campbell Town along the Heritage Highway south.

10. Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex Franklin Square Hobart, TAS, Australia

Fine mid to late Victorian neo-Renaissance group of public buildings of considerable scale and impact, in excellent repair, with other adjacent public buildings (Treasury) form an important historic precinct.
Public Buildings, Franklin Square, Hobart, Tasmania; Thwaites, Jack; 14 Sept-1969;
Public Buildings, Franklin Square, Hobart, Tasmania; Thwaites, Jack; 14 Sept-1969;
Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex
Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex

Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex
Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex

Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex
Franklin Square Public Buildings Complex

  • Mid to late Victorian neo-Renaissance stone public offices and Supreme Court.
  • Fine sandstone, banded rustication to ground levels smooth ashlar above, quoins expresed, double strings between levels, balustraded parapet, balustraded light wells to basement.
  • Segmental pedimented entrys to both facades with giant 3 level Ionic order to Macquarie Street entry. Italianate entry steps to Franklin Square. Fine interiors.
  • Strong relationship of building forms and curtilage importance of Franklin Square. A strong dominant public complex.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #2333

11. Scots Church & Hall 25-29 Bathurst Street, Hobart, TAS, Australia

Scots Church & Hall
Scots Church & Hall

Scots Church & Hall
Scots Church & Hall

Scots Church & Hall
Scots Church & Hall

Scots Church & Hall
Scots Church & Hall

Hall - simple Colonial sandstone chapel of coursed undressed blockwork. No ornamentation. Shallow lancet windows. Iron hip roof.
Church - early Gothic Revival stone building, smooth facade, pecked sides, central tower-like parapet
An excellent group of two buildings occupying a large (although affected in part) site.
  • The hall is of particular interest being the original St Andrew's Church and as such the oldest Presbyterian Church in Australia.
  • The church is of imposing Gothic design well sited with a large flight of stairs from Bathurst Street. The buildings are largely in original and intact condition.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #6638
  • More about Victorian Gothic architectural style - top of page

12. Plassey near Ross

'Plassey', Ross, Tasmania; Orr, Allan; September 1981; TSO00019602
'Plassey', Ross, Tasmania; Orr, Allan; September 1981; TSO00019602
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'Plassey', Ross, Tasmania
Plassey, Ross
  • An unpretentious and pleasing Colonial house. The depth of stonework above the windows incorporateds the attic rooms.
  • As authentic a picture as could be obtained of an early house. Built in the 1830s by Bassett Dickson.
  • NOT listed by Australian National Heritage, NOT listed by Tamanian Heritage Register
  • More about Colonial style architecture - top of page

13. Cottages, Napoleon Street Battery Point

  • Listed on the Register of the National Estate as Mr Watsons Cottages 6-12 Napoleon Street Battery Point, TAS, Australia
Mr Watsons Cottages
Mr Watsons Cottages

Mr Watsons Cottages
Mr Watsons Cottages

Single storey Colonial row of four conjoined cottages.

12 Napoleon Street, Battery Point
12 Napoleon Street, Battery Point

12 Napoleon Street, Battery Point, TAS
12 Napoleon Street, Battery Point, TAS

  • An intact example of the simplest form of row housing in Australia, these cottages are said to have been built for workers from the nearby shipyards. They are an important part of the townscape of Battery Point.
  • Continuous iron hip roof. Central entry door with flanking twelve pane windows to each cottage. Stand very close to street front with unifying timber picket fence.
  • John Watson was a master shipbuilder who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in 1833 and spent several years supervising and training convicts at the government shipyards at Port Arthur. In 1839, Watson leased a site on the eastern side of Napoleon Street and began building ships there.
  • Watson is acknowledged as the father of Hobart’s shipbuilding industry
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #1887, #1888, #1889, #1890 - top of page

Battery Point, Hobart TAS
Battery Point, Hobart TAS


Suburb of Battery Point


Battery Point, Tasmania

One of Hobart’s oldest and most historic areas, Battery Point stands as one of the most authentic ways to step back in time.
  • Buildings made of sandstone have stood since very near the community’s founding. It is famed as one of the more exclusive areas and has a number of large, well built homes, apartments, and even historical cottages.
    Hampden Road, Battery Point
    Hampden Road, Battery Point
  • Connected to Salamanca by Kelly’s Steps, constructed back in the 1830’s out of massive sandstone blocks, Battery Point is on of those places that needs to taken in on foot to really get a good feel for the place.
  • The area can be accessed through Sandy Bay Road and Hampden Road, from the edge of Hobart.
  • Like the nearby Sandy Bay area, those who live in Battery Point have shown themselves to be willing to fight to preserve their way of life against pressures to modernize overly much that might destroy the historic nature of the area.

  • Although the current site was settled in 1804, it was not until 1811 that land grants were given to free settlers. Those grants were used by the first settlers for farming.
    Georgian homes, Battery Point
    Georgian homes, Battery Point
  • By 1814 several farms were located in the area. In 1818 a battery of guns, called the Mulgrave Battery, were placed on the southern side of the point as part of the coastal defenses on the deep water port established at Hobart Town.
  • Although the outpost was originally established as a penal colony and defensive outpost, by the 1820’s the area had began to have free settlers arrive or establish themselves on farms around Hobart Town.

14. Clifton Priory, 2 Wentworth Street, Bothwell, TAS, Australia

  • Listed on the Register of the National Estate
  • Built in 1848, The Priory Country Lodge in Bothwell, Tasmania has been recently been refurbished into luxurious lodge accommodation with sweeping country surrounds.
    external image Clifton%252520Priory%252520Animation.gif
  • The Tudor style house sits elegantly on top of Adelaide Hill with a large, inviting front door that opens into a space full of old-world charm.
external image Clifton%252520Priory%252520interior%252520animation.gif
Clifton Priory Wentworth Street Bothwell, TAS, Australia
Clifton Priory Wentworth Street Bothwell, TAS, Australia


external image the-priory-country-lodge_1.jpg
external image priory1.jpg
The Priory Country Lodge at dusk. As a classified historic town, Bothwell has 18 buildings classified by the National Trust and a further 34 listed.
The Priory Country Lodge showcases how a former Church residence now provides a cosy place for guests to relax
external image front.jpg
external image Bothwell-3.jpg
  • Two storey stone Tudor Gothic house built in 1847-8 by Rev. Robert Wilson from public subscription.
  • Wilson caused a scandal when he ran into financial difficulties and sold it owing a considerable sum.
  • The house is magnificently sited on Barrack Hill from where it enjoys fine views of Bothwell, the Clyde River and surrounding countryside.
  • Last sold for $1,500,000 on 24/12/2011
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #63 - top of page
  • More about Tudor Revival style, More about Gothic Revival style - top of page

Village of Bothwell


Bothwell, Tasmania

Bothwell is a fine example of Tasmania's colonial heritage with more than 50 Heritage classified buildings.
Bothwell, Tasmania
Bothwell, Tasmania

  • Situated in the scenic Clyde River Valley and gateway to Tasmania's central highlands, Bothwell was settled by farmers in the 1820s and still has a distinctive colonial Georgian character and old-world atmosphere today.
  • More than 50 buildings in Bothwell are heritage-listed for their architectural and historical value, so take a stroll along the wide streets and enjoy the details of built treasures that range from simple stone cottages to grand, elegant churches.
  • While exploring, take a walk in Queens Park - a striking village green with lovely views from the heart of town.
  • Bothwell is home to one of the oldest golf courses in Australia at Ratho, laid in the mid-1830s, with square putting greens and fairways maintained by grazing sheep.You can even play a round with traditional hickory clubs.
  • Locals and visitors also come to the nearby lakes, rivers and reserves to fly fish for the elusive brown trout and hunt for game.


15. Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns Lyell Hwy New Norfolk, TAS, Australia

Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns
Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns

Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns
Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns

Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns
Turriff Lodge Hop Kilns

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Brick and stone hop kilns built in 1815 on Turiff Lodge, the summer retreat of Governor Davey, and the site for early hop growing experiments by Governor Eardley-Wilmot.
  • The kilns occupy an outstandingly beautiful natural site, that sadly has been compromised by new unrelated housing.

Commentary from On The Convict Trail blog:
  • "The hop kilns are all that remains of what is probably one of the most important pieces of Tasmanian history. It was part of the country estate which was used by a succession of Tasmanian Governors and was was originally known as "Governor's Retreat" or "Government House".
    Turriff Lodge, Governor's Residence, New Norfolk
    Turriff Lodge, Governor's Residence, New Norfolk
  • "It was constructed very early in the settlement of New Norfolk, well before 1820 and perhaps as early as 1815. It was constructed by Lieutenant Governor Davey and had a suite of rooms for the Governor along with servant's quarters and other facilities.
  • "The hopfields at "Governor's Retreat" were becoming run down. It wasnt until 1871 that Alexander Riddoch, a well to do landowner from Glenorchy, came to it's rescue.
  • "He renamed the property "Turriff Lodge", after his Scottish home, "Turriff", which is 30 miles from Aberdeen. By 1878, his efforts had reclaimed the farm for efficient hop production.
Turriff Lodge, front gate entrance
Turriff Lodge, front gate entrance

Turriff Lodge, view of homestead and hop field
Turriff Lodge, view of homestead and hop field

  • "The property was compulsorily acquired by the government towards the end of World War 2 for the construction of a school and hospital (Neither of which were ever constructed).
  • "The Lodge, which had been the lovingly cared for home of the Onslows for close on 30 years was left vacant by the government and vandals wreaked havoc on the place. They burned floorboard, ripped out fireplaces and smashed windows."
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  • "This most valuable historic residence as it was ultimately bulldozed to the ground as the area around the original estate was subdivided and sold off. The hop kilns remained in place and in good condition, set in well kept grounds.
  • "As the subdivisions continued through the early 1990's, the kilns were purchased and have become a very distinctive private residence and continue as such to this day. A real and important link to the very earliest days of the colony."
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #1250 - top of page

Town of New Norfolk


New Norfolk, Tasmania

New Norfolk is a bustling town located approximately 30 minutes west of Hobart, on the beautiful Derwent River in Tasmania, Australia, and has a rich history, quality produce and pretty rural scenery. It's also the commercial and residential heart of the Derwent Valley.
Derwent River near New Norfolk, Tasmania
Derwent River near New Norfolk, Tasmania

  • The town is the third oldest settlement in Tasmania, established by evacuees relocated from Norfolk Island after the island prison was abandoned in 1807.
  • It's historic past is evident in the many early buildings found in the town including one of Australia's oldest pubs and Australia's oldest Anglican church, St Matthews. It also has one of Australia's few traditional village squares.
  • New Norfolk has a rich hop-growing past and is still the centre of the surrounding hop-growing area, producing most of the hops for Australian breweries.
  • Close to New Norfolk you'll notice some unusual looking buildings called oust houses that are used to dry the hops in preparation for the brewing process.
  • Further afield, New Norfolk is close to Mount Field National Park and the South West Wilderness beyond.
  • A wide range of accommodation options are available including grand old homestead, lodge and


16. The Old Hutchins School, now Masonic Club 181 Macquarie Street Hobart, TAS, Australia

  • Listed on the Register of the National Estate
The Hutchins School was established in 1846 at Hobart Town in memory of The Venerable William Hutchins, first Archdeacon of Van Diemen's Land.
Hutchins School, Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018123
Hutchins School, Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018123
Hutchins School, Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018122
Hutchins School, Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018122

Hutchins School, 181 Macquarie Street, Hobart, Tasmania. Designed by William Archer and built c.1849.
This image is part of a large collection of photographs which were entered in The Mercury Historic Homes Photographic Competition, 1963.
  • The School commenced operations under Headmaster John Richard Buckland at Ingle Hall, a large Georgian house dating from 1811 which still stands in lower Macquarie Street, Hobart.
  • Three years later it moved several blocks up Macquarie Street to a purpose-built schoolhouse designed by Tasmanian architect, William Archer. A bluestone school building with tower in Tudor-Gothic style possibly inspired by the Colleges of Oxford & Cambridge.
  • The so called Gothic (Christian) Style of architecture has in this case resulted in a pleasing building with a facade of delicate complexities.
  • A picturesque building whose impact is heightened by the foreboding tower.
Masonic Club
Masonic Club

Masonic Club
Masonic Club

Masonic Club
Masonic Club

Masonic Club
Masonic Club

  • Two storey bluestone building in Tudor-Gothic style sandstone. Trimmings include window reveals and mullions, chimneys and parapet copings.
  • Central square tower with castellated parapet and turret to north-west corner: quoins, window mouldings, carving, string.
  • Unusual facade composition includes major window (with tracery) to ground floor and unequal gable-ends at roof level. Curtilage destroyed by complete tarmacing. Roof is twin tile gables.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #77
  • More about the Gothic Revival style - top of page

17. St Andrews Presbyterian Church High Street Evandale, TAS, Australia

  • Not listed on the Register of the National Estate
  • WINNER: "best preserved or restored" place of worship in Tasmania.
A much admired example of Greek Revival Architecture, St. Andrews is known as the "best preserved or restored" place of worship in Tasmania.
  • The winner of the prize for the best preserved and restored place of worship in 1963 Hobart Mercury competition.
St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Evandale Tasmania.; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018446
St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Evandale Tasmania.; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018446

St. Andrew’s Uniting (Presbyterian) Church
St. Andrew’s Uniting (Presbyterian) Church

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Evandale Tasmania.
St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Evandale Tasmania, built 1839


Presbyterian Manse (Former)
Presbyterian Manse (Former)



Presbyterian Manse (Former)
Presbyterian Manse (Former)

Presbyterian Manse (Former), 27 High St, Evandale
Listed on the Register of the National Estate
A perfectly symmetrical Georgian house, even to the point of having two front doors, built in 1838-40 by the Rev. Robert Russell as a Manse.

18. Interior of St Andrews Presbyterian Church, Evandale

  • NOT Listed on the Register of the National Estate
external image nla.pic-vn5215439-v
external image Interior%252520Presbyterian%252520Church%252520Evandale.jpg
Venetian glass chandelier
The church interior still retains its cedar box pews, also tall pulpit with sounding board

Town of Evandale


Evandale, Tasmania

Evandale is situated in the Australian state of Tasmania, on the South Esk River 20 km south of Launceston and 5 km from the main highway and Launceston Airport.
National Penny Farthing Championship - Photo of Contestants
National Penny Farthing Championship - Photo of Contestants

  • Originally established as a military post in 1811, it was known variously as Collins Hill, Patersons Plains, Gordon Plains, and Morven before the town's name was changed to Evansdale and eventually to Evandale in 1836 in honour of Tasmania's first Surveyor-General, G.W. Evans and declared a municipality in 1865.
  • Evandale today is a National Trust classified Georgian village, popular with tourists for its unspoiled heritage buildings notably St Andrews Church, the Uniting Church, with its classical bell tower and Doric columns, Blenheim (1832) in High Street; Royal Oak (1840) and adjoining stables now Evandale Antiques, Clarendon Arms Hotel (1847) and Fallgrove (1826) in Russell Street; Solomon House (1836), and the saddler's shop (1840) at the intersection of Russell Street and High Street.


19. The Priory, Davey Street Hobart

Fine example of late Georgian residence in imposing hillside location with superb views of River Derwent.
The Priory and Barn
The Priory and Barn

The Priory and Barn
The Priory and Barn

The Priory and Barn
The Priory and Barn

The Priory and Barn
The Priory and Barn

Built by Hugh Ross.
A recent totally unsympathetic and insensitive encompassing townhouse development significantly reduces the heritage worth of the place.
An elegant building with later Edwardian porticos the complex contains a unique outbuilding of curious design. A recent totally unsympathetic and insensitive encompassing townhouse development significantly reduces the heritage worth of the place.
  • Two storey brick residence in late Georgian style. Edwardian porticos of grouped posting with solid balusters replace a Victorian arcaded verandah of c1810.
  • Slate hip roof. Bay to south facade. Roof dormers on east side. Fifteen pane windows to ground floor. Twelve pane windows to upper floor. Shutters. Attractive outbuilding of single storey brick with tall attic space.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #3110 - top of page

20. Richmond Bridge Bridge Street, Richmond, TAS, Australia


Australia's oldest bridge, built by convict labour with the foundation stone laid on December 11, 1823.
  • The necessity for the bridge was pointed out by Royal Commissioner John Thomas Bigge in 1820.
  • When completed, the bridge was one of the engineering triumphs of the new colony, which permitted heavy traffic to proceed under any conditions to the east coast, and later to Port Arthur.
  • It is the essential townscape element of Richmond, Tasmania
Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge

Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge

Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge

  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #1101 - top of page

Village of Richmond


Richmond, Tasmania

Historic buildings in Richmond, Tasmania
Historic buildings in Richmond, Tasmania

Richmond is a picture-perfect town in the heart of the Coal River Valley wine region that tells the story of an early Australian colonial village. This is the perfect place to learn about Tasmania's past and can be as easy as a stroll down the pretty nineteenth century streets.
  • Richmond has more than 50 Georgian buildings, many beautifully restored and now operating as cafes, restaurants, galleries and accommodation.
  • The town's most photographed landmark is the Richmond Bridge. Built by convicts in the 1820s, it's the oldest bridge in Australia and offers a perfect picnic spot on the grassy banks of the Coal River.
  • The Richmond Gaol is also the oldest gaol in Australia. Standing inside the stone cells gives an eerie insight into the hardships and brutality of convict life in early Van Diemen's Land.
  • Not so confronting is the Hobart Town Historical Model Village where you can learn about the life of settlers in Hobart in the 1820s.



21. Doorway, Poplarville & Grounds 68 Risdon Road, New Town, TAS, Australia

Single storey sandstone, early Victorian house and stone outbuildings in fine setting.
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  • This fantastic Georgian house has had two names in its long and dignified history, It was first known officially as Poplarville due to the number of poplar trees planted around it, and then unofficially it became known as The Pines, after the two fantastic Norfolk Island pines that frame the front of the house. - On the Convict Trail
'Poplarville' Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; 1963; TSO00018016
'Poplarville' Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; 1963; TSO00018016

Poplarville & Grounds
Poplarville & Grounds

View of 'Poplarville', 68 Risdon Rd. Hobart, Tasmania, erected c.1845.
The Mercury Historic Homes Photographic Competition, 1963.
The Norfolk Island pines which flank Poplarville’s front elevation were reputedly planted at the end of the Crimean War in 1856.
Single storey ashlar freestone cottage with dormers, quoined corners, twelve pane sash windows, hipped slate roof with close eaves. The windows are shuttered and the front door surround is moulded. The four panel front door has sidelights and geometric transom light.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #2735 - top of page

22. Macquarie Cottage 301 Macquarie Street, Hobart, TAS, Australia

Good example of a Colonial cottage: important because of its verandah treillage detailing and its fine mature garden and the resultant sequential entry to the house from Macquarie Street.
  • Single storey brick and stucco colonial cottage with important mature plantings retained in garden. Iron hip roof.
  • Many additions at rear. Timber verandah with fine treillage detailing. French doors to verandah. Stone foundations and basement.
French window, 'Macquarie Cottage', Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018113
French window, 'Macquarie Cottage', Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1963; TSO00018113

French door, 'Macquarie Cottage', Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; December 1962; TSO00018114
French door, 'Macquarie Cottage', Hobart, Tasmania; Unknown; December 1962; TSO00018114
French window, 'Macquarie Cottage', Hobart, Tasmania
From National Trust of Australia (Tasmania)
French door to 'Macquarie Cottage', 301 Macquarie St, Hobart, Tasmania. c.1824.
  • One of two double glazed french windows at the front of 'Macquarie Cottage', 301 Macquarie St, Hobart, Tasmania.
  • The name of the glazier can still be seen on some of the panes. The cottage was built c.1824.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #90

23. Doorway, 'Loscombe', 16 Florence St, Moonah TAS

  • NOT Listed on the Register of the National Estate
  • A late fanlight, as this house dates from 1860.
'Loscombe'; Unknown; 1963; TSO00018381
'Loscombe'; Unknown; 1963; TSO00018381
external image imageDisplay?op=generateWatermarkedImageforFreemium&imageUrl=aHR0cHM6Ly9zdGF0aWMucnBkYXRhLmNvbS9ycGRhQVUvcGhvdG8vbGlzdHNhbGUvNDcweDMxMy8xMC8wMi8wNi8xNjg5MzgzNy8xNjg5MzgzN18xLkpQRw==&height=275&width=440
'Loscombe', 16 Florence St, Moonah TAS
AKA 1 Loscombe Court Moonah TAS 7009

24. St Johns Anglican Church Church Street, Ross, TAS, Australia

  • Listed on the Register of the National Estate
A fine stone Gothic church built in 1868 to a design of architect Henry Hunter.
  • The main feature of the church is the stone spire of unusual design.
  • The original interior of the church is intact.
  • Material for the church is from the original church erected in 1838 on another site.
  • It is an important focal element contributing to the townscape of historic Ross.
St Johns Anglican Church
St Johns Anglican Church

St Johns Anglican Church
St Johns Anglican Church

St Johns Anglican Church
St Johns Anglican Church

'St John's Church of England', Ross, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1970s; TSO00018683.1
'St John's Church of England', Ross, Tasmania; Unknown; c. 1970s; TSO00018683.1

St John's Church of England, Ross, Tasmania c.1869. The church was built with the help of Robert Kermode of Mona Vale, Ross.
  • Sandstone Gothic Revival church. Slate roof.
  • Large circular west window with quatrefoil tracery - theme repeated in north window.
  • Square corner tower with clock and spire. Continuous string around building tieing sills together.
  • Lancet windows to nave. Stone walling at boundaries.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5284
  • More about Gothic Revival style - top of page


25. Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS, Australia

This landmark building is by far the largest and most imposing of the numerous 19th century Inns that catered for travellers between Hobart and Launceston.
  • "Retaining its original character with high ceilings, hand-painted stained glass windows, Victorian cornices, ceiling roses and antique light fittings, it has also been modernised with solar power, natural gas hot water and heating and a PBX phone system to all rooms.
  • Built in 1842 in the Greek Revival style, Dysart House has 22 rooms and during Saturday Magazine columnist Leo Schofield's seven-year stay he restored the home to preserve original features such as the sandstone open fireplaces and cedar joinery.
  • The current owners have undertaken some of their own renovations during their short stay.
  • The 702sq m home has nine bedrooms, seven bathrooms and a commercial kitchen.
  • Listed for $1.6 million" - JESSICA HOWARD MERCURY JANUARY 24, 2014
external image Dysart%252520House%252520animation.gif
Circa 1842 and designed in the Greek Revival (Georgian) style, its main facade is breakfront with 5 bays. The portico has square and round Tuscan columns, framing the central entrance with a four-panel door, fanlight and half sidelights. Two wings, each with attic spaces, enclose a huge flagged courtyard and caretaker's quarters. Gallery of images
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Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS, Australia
Central entrance with four panel door and half sidelights in pilaster casing with fanlight over
Built in 1842, it was originally named 'The Green Ponds Hotel' and served as an Inn, Public House and residence until the 1860's. During the next decade it was used as a scholastic establishment for young ladies before reverting to private occupancy.
26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton
Dysart House & Outbuildings
Dysart House & Outbuildings
Two wings, each with attic spaces, enclose a huge flagged courtyard and caretaker's quarters.
Brick coachhouse with stone quoins and reveals
Presently a magnificent homestead comprising some 22 rooms, it has been extensively and sympathetically restored preserving original Cedar joinery including folding shutters to the main windows.
26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton

26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton

26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton

26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton

A large two storey Georgian stone house, reputed to be one of the most monumental houses on the Midland Highway.
  • Dysart was built in 1842 by William Henry Ellis as an hotel with the outbuildings erected in 1845.
  • It is well complemented by fine old eucalypts, something of a rarity close to a house in Tasmania. The building is an essential element of the townscape of Kempton.
  • Saturday Magazine columnist Leo Schofield was the last to sell the property, in October 2012, for more than $1.25 million

Two storey Georgian stone house. Main facade is a break-front of five bays.
  • Central entrance with four panel door and half sidelights in pilaster casing with fanlight over. Portico with square and round Tuscan columns.
  • Twelve pane windows, central window with four pane half windows to each side. Iron hip roof behind parapet and cornice.
  • Brick coachhouse with stone quoins and reveals - twelve pane windows - large archway. Fine old gum trees.
  • Sold for $1,150,000 Date: Sat 06-Oct-2012
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5461 -
  • More about Victorian Georgian style - top of page

Village of Kempton


Kempton, Tasmania

Kempton is a quaint colonial town settled in the 1820s, with handsome old buildings and 19th century charm set in a landscape of rolling hills and sweeping plains.
St Mary's Church, Kempton, Tasmania
St Mary's Church, Kempton, Tasmania

  • Established as a colonial settlement in the early 1800s, Kempton became a busy coaching stop for hungry travellers and their horses. These days the village is bypassed by the Midland Highway but still continues to be a stopping point.
  • Signs along the main street tell stories of the town's historic buildings including charming coaching inns and quaint shops.
  • There's a grand and beautiful mansion with imposing outbuildings and elegant churches of all shapes and styles. St Mary's Church of England, with its square tower and tree-lined entrance, also has an adjacent cemetery that tells of the region's early days.
  • Kempton also has antique and second hand stores and an historic pub for hearty country meals or accommodation. In the mornings you might even encounter local harness racers out for a trot down the main street.


26. Shot Tower Historic Site 318 Channel Highway, Taroona, TAS, Australia

An outstanding building, believed to be unique in the world, built by Joseph Moir with the assistance of two masons in nine months.
  • Situated on the Channel Highway just south of Taroona is one of the State's most unique historic buildings, the Shot Tower.
  • Joseph Moir's factory, which operated for 35 years from 1870, manufactured lead shot for contemporary muzzle loading sports guns.
  • Although the factory struggled for most of its existence its most recognisable feature, the tallest stone shot tower in the southern hemisphere, has been a prominent landmark in the district for well over a century.
  • Built in 1870, the tower is an outstanding element of industrial archaeological, landscape, and technological interest.

Shot Tower, Brown's River Road, Derwent River, Tasmania
Shot Tower, Brown's River Road, Derwent River, Tasmania
Shot Tower, Taroona, Tasmania; Thwaites, Jack; 1963; TSO00018398
Shot Tower, Taroona, Tasmania; Thwaites, Jack; 1963; TSO00018398

A printed colour postcard showing the Shot Tower, residence and the Derwent River, near Taroona, Hobart, Tasmania.
Shot Tower Residence, Taroona, Tasmania. Building erected 1870
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Shot Tower, Taroona, Tasmania; Thwaites, Jack; 1963; TSO00018397
Shot Tower, Taroona, Tasmania; Stephens, Don; 1963; TSO00018396
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  • It is the only remaining circular sandstone shot tower in the world.
  • The distinctive circular tower stands 48 metres tall and was built in 1870 for the purpose of producing lead shot.
  • Lead, with added arsenic and antimony was cast into ingots, remelted in cauldrons and then poured through colanders, forming droplets which became roughly spherical as they dropped into a tub of water at the base of the tower.
    Inscription over doorway to Shot Tower
    Inscription over doorway to Shot Tower
View from the Shot Tower
View from the Shot Tower

Built in 1870 for the production of (lead) (buck)shot, this sandstone tower rises 58 metres above the banks of the Derwent, affording spectacular views up, down and across the river.
  • The tower is ten metres in diameter at the base and 3.9 metres at the top - the walls a metre thick at the bottom thin out to 45 centimetres at the top.
  • Molten lead was dropped from top to bottom of the hollow tower and its rapid descent and cooling roughly shaped it into pellets.
  • There is a museum at the base of the tower and a tea rooms alongside. There are 259 steps to the top, but 25 landings on which to catch your breath. Opening Times: Daily 0900 - 1700. Closed Christmas Day.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #3635 - top of page

27. The Anglican Church of St James, 1 Louisa Street, Ranelagh TAS, Australia

  • NOT Listed on the Register of the National Estate
St James' Ranelagh lies on the western edge of Huonville, the major town of the Huon Valley. It is about 40km from Hobart. Set on the banks of the Huon River. The parish, which is the southernmost in the Anglican Church in Australia, had its beginnings in 1839 with the consecration of a wooden church (St Mary’s) built for the settlement by Lady Franklin. This is the third Ranelagh St. James church on this site.
  • It is a gem of a small 19th Century gothic revival church and is heritage listed in Tasmania.
external image Ranelagh1.jpg
external image Ranelagh2.jpg
From National Trust of Australia (Tasmania).St. James Anglican Church, Ranelagh, Tasmania. Architect George Fagg. Built 1896
From National Trust of Australia (Tasmania).St. James Anglican Church, Ranelagh, Tasmania. Architect George Fagg. Built 1896
Organ, St James' Anglican Church Ranelagh
Organ, St James' Anglican Church Ranelagh

Village of Ranelagh



Huonville (including Ranelagh), Tasmania

 2 Louisa Street, Ranelagh TAS 7109
2 Louisa Street, Ranelagh TAS 7109

Ranelagh, is only a few kilometres from Huonville and is now almost a suburb of the larger town.
  • A farm was established on one square mile of land which stretched from Ironstone Creek to the river. This property was originally known as Victoria and included the present site of Huonville. It was here that one of the largest hopfields in Tasmania was established.
  • At the time it seemed that Ranelagh would become the major centre in the valley. However the construction of the bridge further downstream ensured that Huonville prospered while Ranelagh made little progress. It is a comment on the changing fortunes of the two settlements that Ranelagh has three churches (Anglican, Roman Catholic and Uniting) while Huonville, now the larger centre, has only one (Congregational).
  • Located on the Huon River 39 km southwest of Hobart, Huonville is a small but thriving community serving the surrounding apple, timber and hops industries. Although it is relatively small Huonville is recognised as the major centre in the Huon Valley.external image main.jpg
  • The Huon River was first explored by the French Admiral, Bruni D'Entrecasteaux, who named it, a nearby island, a soft pine and the Kermandie River, after the commander of his support vessel, L'Esperance, Captain Huon de Kermadec.
  • As far as can be determined the local Aborigines didn't settle in the Huon Valley although it is true that when d'Entrecasteaux entered the river in 1792 his party did make contact with an Aboriginal girl Oura-Oura near the present site of Cygnet.
  • The establishment of the British settlement at Hobart Town in 1804 led to the exploration of the area by the botanist Robert Brown but he dismissed it as unsuitable for settlement because of poor soil. This did not stop the timber getters and whalers from camping in the area while searching for stands of timber and schools of whales.
  • It is thought that the first white man to settle permanently in the area was a 'bolter', an escaped convict, who was found by timber getters in early 1820s. The man, whose name was Martin, had built a primitive camp near Price's Creek.


Next Page: Entries 28 - 53



Australia's Architectural Styles

From a deleted page by Heritage Tasmania and from the Wikipedia page Australian residential architectural styles

Old Colonial c 1788 - c 1840


Colonial Architecture is the term used for the buildings constructed in Australia between European settlement in January 1788 and about 1840.
  • Most buildings erected in the first 50 years of Australian settlement were simple and plain.
  • Australia's first settlers built simple houses using building materials available to them such as clay, bush timber and stone. Roofs were thatched or shingled.
  • Convict huts, marine barracks, government stores and houses for officials were simple rectangular prisms covered with hipped or gabled roofs often with verandahs supported on wooden columns in the Classical manner.
  • They were influenced in particular by the regulation British military buildings in India and other tropical locations.

Georgian

  • In Australia, the Georgian style was simplified and restrained, possibly as a response to the social and environmental circumstances in which the settlers found themselves.
  • Typical houses of the period were made with a hipped roof and a verandah. This style was so appropriate to the new colony that it was used throughout the 19th century for many homesteads.

At the time of the first settlement, Georgian architecture was the architectural vernacular in Britain.
  • A typical Georgian house of the 19th century was simple, elegant and formal in style.
  • The cottages they built were simple, influenced by the Georgian architecture popular in Britain.
  • Towards the end of the period, the ordered classical lines of Grecian architecture were being introduced, especially where a powerful look was called for.In contrast, other architects were following their emotions and looking back to the romantic style of medieval England. This Gothic style was often used for churches.
Bowood, Bridport Road, Bridport, TAS
Bowood, Bridport Road, Bridport, TAS

Macquarie House 17 Church Street, Ross, TAS
Macquarie House 17 Church Street, Ross, TAS

Eardley-Wilmot Tomb, St. David's Park, Hobart
Eardley-Wilmot Tomb, St. David's Park, Hobart


Conjoined Houses 169-171 St John Street, Launceston
Conjoined Houses 169-171 St John Street, Launceston

'Plassey', Ross, Tasmania; Orr, Allan; September 1981; TSO00019602
'Plassey', Ross, Tasmania; Orr, Allan; September 1981; TSO00019602

Poplarville & Grounds
Poplarville & Grounds


Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS
Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS

Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS
Dysart House & Outbuildings, 26 Main Street, Kempton, TAS

26 Main Street, Kempton
26 Main Street, Kempton


Old Colonial Regency Style

  • The 1820s and 1830s was a period of expansion and prosperity for the Tasmanian colony. The buildings of this period reflected that prosperity, with architectures introducing subtle classical detailing. The style is commonly called Colonial Regency
Lake House 599 Delmont Road, Cressy, TAS, Australia
Lake House 599 Delmont Road, Cressy, TAS, Australia

Victorian c 1840 - 1890

The term 'Victorian' refers to the reign of England's Queen Victoria, which began in 1839. It is divided into Early Victorian (1840-1865), Mid Victorian (1865080) and Late Victorian (1880-1890)
  • Australia was growing from a convict outpost into a strong economic contributor for the United Kingdom. Agriculture, sheep, cattle and the discovery of gold in the eastern states led to an increase in the number of free settlers searching for wealth.
  • The architecture of the period reflected the confidence, progress and prosperity of the young colonies.
  • Differences from the earlier styles reflected new and better materials being available. Corrugated iron replaced the shingled roofs of the Colonial era and glass was being produced in larger sheets.

  • Old Colonial Gothic Picturesque


Old Colonial Gothic Picturesque - Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, designed by Francis Greenway
Old Colonial Gothic Picturesque - Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, designed by Francis Greenway


Gothic Revival 1840–1880
While Georgian and Regency styles continued to be used for public buildings seeking to reflect wealth and power, Gothic styles were still the choice for churches.

Shene Stables
Shene Stables


Originally Gothic Style was for God, and Classical Style for the man.
  • Later a new "self-made" Australian began to emerge, unhindered by a classical British education dictating classical gentlemanly interests.
  • This "new" self-made man (like his contemporaries in Britain) would often choose Gothic as the design for his home.
Redlands TAS
Redlands TAS

Scots Church & Hall
Scots Church & Hall

Clifton Priory, 2 Wentworth Street Bothwell, TAS
Clifton Priory, 2 Wentworth Street Bothwell, TAS

Masonic Club
Masonic Club

St Johns Anglican Church
St Johns Anglican Church

The Anglican Church of St James, 1 Louisa Street Ranelagh
The Anglican Church of St James, 1 Louisa Street Ranelagh


Federation c 1890 - 1915

Federation refers to the movement to join the six Australian colonies into one nation, which happened on 1 January 1901.
The Federation style is perhaps the most easily identified Australian architectural style.
  • Despite new-found national pride, architects still took ideas from overseas and the many fluctuating fashions of the time, resulting in 12 distinct styles for the period.
  • Classical styles continued to be used for public buildings that needed to express authority, power, wealth and culture. The Gothic style was still used for churches, though later in the period the Romanesque style popular in America was favoured.
  • For the domestic home, Queen Anne, Arts and Craft and the Bungalow were the choice of the day.
  • Roofs were predominantly galvanized iron, although there was an increasing use of terracotta tiling. With this increased use also came the introduction of decorative ridge tiles, finials and the roof ornamentation commonly seen in the Queen Anne style.
  • Following the international Arts and Craft Movement, decoration became more important. Cast iron was out of fashion, but ornamental woodwork became popular. Brickwork incorporated detailing around windows, doors and chimneys. Leadlight windows became more common, but the veranda became a simple entry porch.

From:
Tasmania Online | Service Tasmania



Reference: Priceless Heritage



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Priceless Heritage: Historic Buildings of Tasmania
  • Text by Clifford Craig, Brian Lewis, Robin Boyd and Roy S. Smith
  • National Trust of Australia (Tasmania), [Hobart], 1964, 2 ed 1971

"The second edition has some of the images registered differently from the first edition. It includes a new “Publisher’s Note” and there are updates to the Notes on the Buildings and the Notes on Architects. Probably the better of the two editions." - Southwing Fine Books

Buy this book through Abebooks:
Priceless Heritage Historic Buildings of Tasmania by The National Trust
Published by Platypus Publications, Hobart (1 ed 1964) (2 ed 1971)

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  1. ^ http://www.domain.com.au/news/tasmanian-luxury-home-lake-house-built-by-convicts-and-restored-for-21st-century-20161124-gss3mn/
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