The Heritage of Tasmania: Southern Region - Brighton

external image The%2BHeritage%2Bof%2BTasmania-%2Bthe%2Billustrated%2Bregister%2Bof%2Bthe%2BNational%2BEstate%2B518181563.0.m.1.jpg
[Previous Post: National Trust Tasmanian Heritage Register 9 .... Next Post: National Trust Tasmanian Heritage Register 11 ]

This post is derived from "The Heritage of Tasmania; The Illustrated Register of the National Estate" (Macmillan, Melbourne 1983)

The Tasmanian National Trust Heritage list has been 'rescinded' by the State Government, so on these pages I have started to reconstruct it.
  1. Southern Region
  2. South-Eastern Region
  3. Western Region
  4. North West Region
  5. North East Region

1. Southern Region of Tasmania

  1. Bothwell (previous page)
  2. Brighton
    1. Mangalore-Bagdad and the 'Mangalore Heritage Mile'
    2. Elderslie and Broadmarsh
    3. Pontville Village
    On following pages:
  3. Bruny
  4. Clarence
  5. Esperance
(Property Links below are usually to the Australian Heritage Database Listing)

2. Brighton Municipality

In 1821 Governor Macquarie selected the site for a town, and named it Brighton.
  • The site lay on the main north-south route, and Brighton developed into a small military post.
  • In the 1830s, Pontville was laid out nearby on the Jordan River, and with its church, police station, courthouse, barracks, inns and imposing private houses soon overtook Brighton in size and importance. However, the names Brighton and Pontville were used interchangeably.
With the end of the convict system, and faster travel on the main road, both towns declined into small country centres, though the municipality of Brighton was set up in 1863.
Brighton is a suburb 27 km north of Hobart, in Tasmania, Australia.

Table of Contents


  • It is between Pontville and the outer Hobart suburb of Bridgewater on the Midland Highway.
  • At the 2006 census, Brighton had a population of 3,145.
  • From 1826 onwards, the Brighton township was the site of the Brighton Barracks, a military accommodation facility until sold off for subdivision in the early 2000s.[2]
  • A Brighton Post Office opened on 1 June 1832. This was renamed Pontville in 1895 and closed in 1973. The current Brighton office opened on 22 May 1964.[3]
  • Don't miss the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary, 593 Briggs Road, Brighton
external image BONORONG%2BWILDLIFE%2BSANCTUARY_9115804_OP0698_Devil4_4wx626z.jpgexternal image BONORONG%2BWILDLIFE%2BSANCTUARY__9115798_OP0698_Baby_Mavis_cg2amcq.jpg external image BONORONG%2BWILDLIFE%2BSANCTUARY__9115826_OP0698_Kanga__Girl_jxwga0x.jpgexternal image BONORONG%2BWILDLIFE%2BSANCTUARY__9115816_OP0698_Cape_Barren_geese__Jamie_Stephens_4qpqk4p.jpg

Pontville is a small rural community 28 kilometres (17 mi) north of Hobart, in the south-east of Tasmania, Australia.
The scenic riverside settlement of Pontville is rich in heritage and natural attractions.
  • As one of Tasmania's oldest settlements, Pontville offers plenty of history to explore with several churches and cemeteries as well as the ruins of the first shops and garrison buildings.
  • Located near Brighton, just north of Hobart, Pontville sits on a hill overlooking the Jordan River on one side and a vast plain on the other that was once an Aboriginal travelling route between Tasmania's north and south.
  • At the 2006 census, Pontville had a population of 2,166.[1]
Bridgewater became a (small) business centre, with a railway junction and the largest stock sales in the south.
Samuel Clifford, 'Brighton Township' (in fact Pontville), c 1873 (W.L. Crowther Library, SLT)
Samuel Clifford, 'Brighton Township' (in fact Pontville), c 1873 (W.L. Crowther Library, SLT)

National Trust Registered structures in Brighton Municipality:

(15 properties listed in 1983 publication: The Heritage of Tasmania, pages 12-14)

1.The Lodge, Midland Hwy, Brighton, TAS, Australia

A very original integrated cottage and outbuildings group comprising stone cottage and generally timber outbuildings.

  • external image thumbnail.pl?rp03635a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03635
The group is basically intact and a scarce remaining example of Colonial vernacular architecture in Tasmania.
2. Broadmarsh Post Office, Elderslie Rd, Broadmarsh, TAS, Australia
  • A picturesque example of a Gothic Revival house built about 1845.

external image Old%2BPO%2BBroadmarsh%2BIMG_1372A.jpg
  • The two and three storey stone house has a separate kitchen wing and a detached stable-coach house.
  • The building is notable for its consistently pitched steep gable roofs and is the focal element of the small hamlet of Broadmarsh.external image thumbnail.pl?rp03631aexternal image thumbnail.pl?rp03631

3. 'Strathelie' and outbuildings, RA 974 Elderslie Rd, Broadmarsh, TAS, Australia

  • A very impressive late Georgian house built in 1851 of silver grey sandstone, featuring a parapeted facade, enclosed rear courtyard, fine front door and front verandah with slender iron columns.
  • The house is complemented by particularly fine outbuildings comprising stone barn with arched openings and brick stable forming a u-shape about a central yard. All intact and in good order.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630b

4. 'Stonefield' formerly 'Braeside', 266 Elderslie Rd, Lower Broadmarsh (Brighton), TAS, Australia

  • A good example of a two storey Georgian stone home with a separate kitchen wing (now incorporated into house).
  • Built in 1824, the house is well sited in the landscape.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03628 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03628a

5. Jordan House and Stable, RA 622 Elderslie Rd, Lower Broadmarsh (Brighton), TAS

An impressive late Georgian house of near square plan and built of mellow convict bricks with sandstone trimmings.
  • The house and its adjacent stone stable are intact and in good condition, standing close to the road and providing a good contribution to the landscape.
  • external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629b external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629

6. 'Shene' Stables, Mangalore

An outstanding and unique stone stables contrived by Francis Butler and his father Gamaliel Butler as a romantic, picturesque composition.
It is a notable example of a Victorian Gothic building influenced by pattern books, which makes a memorable impact in the landscape.
'Shene' Stables, Mangalore, TAS
'Shene' Stables, Mangalore, TAS


7. 'Oakwood', Mangalore

A late Georgian two storey stone house with considerable thought given to the approach and visual impact through the use of an axial driveway and flanking walls, giving the house extra dimension.
external image thumbnail.pl?rt40668 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40669 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40671 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40670 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40667

8. 'Tivoli' and Barns (Gagebrook) off Old Beach Road, Old Beach

An intact single storey Victorian stone house built about 1880. It is a focal building in the countryside.
external image thumbnail.pl?rt40676 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40677 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40681 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40678 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40679
  • The property was restored by the Housing Department in the mid to late 1980s to be community offices but fell into disrepair.
  • The current owners have restored the property and it is in very good repair. They have also restored the name to reflect the original name of John Gage's property: Gagebrook.
  • The two barns were burned down some time before the current owners purchased the property.

9. 'Lansdowne', 4 Glebe Street, Pontville

  • A single storey Victorian Filigree stone house built about 1879 and notable for its return verandah with fine timber detailing.
  • The house has a dominant hillside location and is essential to the townscape of historic Pontville.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03632external image Pontville%2BDSC02411.JPG
'Lansdowne', 4 Glebe Street, Pontville

10. 'The Row' (formerly 'The Barracks') Main Road, (Midland Highway) Pontville

  • An early stone barracks building erected adjacent to the Jordan River crossing at a focal position in this historic village.
  • Its long row appearance is due to a later matching addition.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rt27939 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40672 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40673 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40675
  • The building is essential to the townscape of Pontville.

11. Dwelling, Antique Shop (formerly Old Post Office)

  • 268 Midland Highway, Pontville, TAS
  • A typical Georgian stone building basically intact. Formerly a post office and originally an officers' mess.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rt27940external image The%2BOld%2BPost%2BOffice%2B%2528Officers%2527%2BMess%252C%2BAntique%2BShop%2529%2BPH30_1_594-c.jpgexternal image Pontville%2BDSC02404.JPG
  • The building standing right on the present road alignment is an essential part of the historic character of Pontville.

12. St Mark's Church of England, Midland Highway, Pontville

  • A very unusual Romanesque church built in 1839-41 to a design of convict architect James Blackburn from very finely tooled local white freestone.
    external image Pontville3.jpgexternal image Pontville6.jpgexternal image Pontville-St-Marks.jpgexternal image Pontville2.jpg

13. St Mark's Graveyard and Butler Family Graves, Midland Highway, Pontville

  • The church at the northern end of the town, makes an essential contribution to the townscape of Pontville.
  • external image Pontville-117_edited-1.jpgexternal image Pontville-118.jpgexternal image Pontville-115.jpgexternal image Pontville-119.jpg
  • Historic graveyard contains several Butler family graves.
  • See much more about St Mark's Church of England here

14. 'Brooksby' 284 Midland Highway, Pontville. TAS,

  • Brooksby, Pontville is a two storey stone Georgian house built about 1840.
external image thumbnail.pl?rt27942external image %2527Brooksby%2527%252C%2BPontville%252C%2BTasmania%252C%2Bbuilt%2Bc.%2B1832%2Bp19ga_3sa1_m.jpgexternal image Pontville___Brooksby.jpgexternal image 1p92os1_3sa4_m.jpg
  • It is thought that Brooksby was built just before St Mark's Church of England opposite, and early church services were held in the stone stables.
  • It was built for Lt GB Foster, assisstant police magistrate in the district and with its fine garden is an important element of the historic town of Pontville.
    Read much more about Brooksby here


15. 'The Shieling 'Queen St, (Midland Highway), Pontville, TAS

external image sheiling4.jpg
  • also known as 2 Rifle Range Road, Pontville
  • Featured in the ABC Program "Who's been sleeping in my House?" Monday, 19 December 2011: Episode 5: The Sheiling
    • Like many towns in Tasmania, the people of Pontville are proud of their historic buildings – and particularly an impressive stone house called The Sheiling.
  • The Sheiling, situated behind St. Marks Church (1841), was built on the old "Bell's Line of Road" linking Hobart and Launceston and, in fact, a section of the old road is now the driveway.
    • "The date on the gate gives a clue to its age, ‘Circa 1819’, which would make the house one of the oldest buildings in Tasmania. It’s quite a claim, but not everyone is convinced."
      external image main.jpgexternal image sheiling1.jpgexternal image sheiling2.jpgexternal image sheiling3.jpg
  • "Determining the age of their home isn’t their only quest. Coral and Peter share their back garden with an eerie headstone. The writing is illegible, and they can only make out a few letters. Whose grave is it? There are also a series of strange markings carved into the side of a door frame which seem totally inexplicable. "
    • Located on the original road heading north from Hobart, The Sheiling was originally two conjoined dwellings.
  • The Colonial Georgian building is constructed from locally quarried sandstone, and features upper dormer windows and a truncated roofline. There is a large central stone chimney, with fireplaces on the ground and first floors of both dwellings.

16. Derwent River Wildlife Sanctuary

Derwent River map
Derwent River map

The largest reserve on the Derwent estuary including most of the wetlands and mudflats north of Dogshear Point.
external image Tasmanian%2BDevil%2B%2526%2BWildlife%2BSanctuary.pngexternal image River%2BDerwent%2BMarine%2BConservation%2BArea.jpg
River Derwent Marine Conservation Area


  • The Derwent estuary extends from the rural river town of New Norfolk south to the Iron Pot lighthouse.
    • The River Derwent Conservation area is the largest reserve on the Derwent estuary (1,637 hectares) and occupies most of the wetlands and mudflats below the high water mark between New Norfolk and Dogshear Point

    • The estuary is a unique environment; a partially enclosed body of water where tidal seawater and fresh river water mix.
    • external image Derwent%2BEstuary.jpgexternal image Derwent%2BEstuary%2Bdolphins.jpg
    • The sheltered waters of the estuary support unique habitat and species specifically adapted to life in this environment.
  • What we recognise today as the Derwent estuary was formed between 6,500 and 13,000 years ago when the sea level rose flooding a river valley.
    • Today, wetlands and shallow mud flats dominate the upper Derwent estuary, north of the Bowen Bridge. The middle estuary has a convoluted shoreline with numerous small bays and inlets. Below the Tasman Bridge there is a single large bay - Ralphs Bay - to the east and on the west a relatively straight shoreline scattered with cliffs and beaches.

Bagdad - Mangalore

The small township of Mangalore is located on the Midland Highway 32kms north of Hobart.
  • It is named after a city in the Indian state of Karnataka.
  • The gracious, historic and private homesteads, Wybra Hall, Oakwood and Marlbrook at Mangalore are the legacy of an area that became prosperouos from wheat growing in the early nineteenth century.
  • One significant cultural landscape of the area is the Chauncy Vale Wildlife Sanctuary east of Bagdad.
    This Sanctuary is one of Tasmania's oldest private conservation areas and has both Aboriginal cultural heritage significance as well as European settlement heritage value.
    It was also the home of the children's author, Nan Chauncy and is highly valued in the region.

The early history of Bagdad

Bagdad in Tasmania is a small country town about 37km north of Hobart on the Midlands Highway.
  • The first Europeans settled Tasmania in the early 1800’s at Risdon Cove near where Hobart is today.
  • The first land grants were issued in Bagdad in 1813.
The town was named by the explorer Hugh Germain, a private in the Royal Marines. He was said to carry two books in his saddlebags while travelling: the Bible and the Arabian Nights, which he used as inspiration when he named places. Read more at Bagdad, Tasmania at Wikipedia.
  • Previously this land was home to the Aboriginal people who lived here for many thousands of years. The Bagdad area was originally known as "The Vale of Bagdad" which extended from the foot of Constitution Hill in the north to Brighton in the south.
  • Bagdad was one of the first country areas to be settled and when the road was being put through to what is now Launceston, gangs of convicts and their overseers were housed in and around Bagdad. Read more: http://www.bagdadtashistory.com/

Heritage Mile Significant Buildings

  • There are a number of properties that are of heritage significance in Bagdad and Mangalore.
  • The ‘Heritage Mile’ at Mangalore is a significant heritage ‘precinct’ of the area.
    The ‘Heritage Mile’ consists of four homesteads set within expansive rural landscapes with hedgerows and significant trees.
  • Of the four homesteads, all are intact and highly prominent from the Midland Highway, three (Oakwood, Marlbrook & Woodburn) are of the early C19th and Wybra Hall is one fine example of a large Federation Queen Anne homestead with associated rural outbuildings.
  • The Mangalore Heritage Mile precinct also contains the Commandant’s Cottage, which is a small cottage associated with the use of convict labour in the valley and the probation station at Pontville. Winton Hill acts as a backdrop to all these properties and helps to places them in a significant cultural landscape. Read more at the Derwent Valley Heritage Management Plan.
    external image main%2BMarlbrook.jpgexternal image thumbnail.pl?rt40670external image Wybra%2BHall%2BDSC03704-Version-2.jpgexternal image Wybra%2BHall%2Bin%2BMangalore%2Bwas%2Binitially%2Ba%2Bprivate%2Bresidence%2Bin%2B1860%2Btasm_020214-8.jpgexternal image Wybra%2BHall%2Btn_wybra2.png
Wybra Hall, Oakwood and Marlbrook form a string of gracious, private and historic homes along the Heritage Highway at Mangalore which are included in a newly proclaimed heritage precinct. They are also the legacy of an area that became prosperous from wheat growing in the early nineteenth century.
  • When driving along the Mangalore section of the Heritage Highway see Historic Shene Stables in the distance, a monument to the wealth of early settlers and excellent example of the skill of convict stonemasonsexternal image The%2BCountry%2BTowns%2Band%2BVillages%2Bof%2BTasmania-%2BRegister%2Bof%2BListed%2BBuildings%2Bmd2192640389.jpg
  • The highway follows its original route, Bell's Line of Road, through Mangalore.



National Trust of Tasmania Register List for Brighton Municipality, Tasmania(from "The Country Towns and Villages of Tasmania" Register of Listed Buildings, edited by J.N.D. Harrison, Hobart 1976) page 34-37
These total 50 in Brighton. (The Tasmanian Heritage Register lists approx. 53 properties within Brighton Council area)

1. Mangalore-Bagdad and the 'Mangalore Heritage Mile':


1. Marlbrook, 1063 Midland Highway Pontville Tas 7030,


  • Classified but Not Australian Heritage listed - on the Mangalore Heritage Mile
  • Built in 1828, Marlbrook is a beautiful double-storey sandstone home on 6ha, just 30 minutes’ drive from Hobart.
  • "The Darceys have lovingly maintained the home’s many period ­features while ensuring the living spaces are fit for the 21st century." (Australian NEWS LIMITED 9:00AM AUGUST 29, 2014) See also this page
    • external image main%2BMarlbrook.jpgexternal image image6%2BMarlbrook.jpgexternal image image8%2BMarlbrook.jpgexternal image image7%2BMarlbrook.jpgexternal image image9%2BMarlbrook.jpg
  • Marlbrook was built by John Hayes, son of one of the pioneer settlers of Hobart. The home was originally supposed to have had three storeys, built in the style of the blue-and-white Willow-pattern plate often seen on Chinese-style porcelain. Sale listing and photographs
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5475



2. Oakwood, 1125 Midland Hwy, Mangalore, TAS
  • Classified, - on the Mangalore Heritage Mile

Mangalore Heritage Mile - Oakwood, 1125 Midland Hwy, Mangalore, TAS,
Mangalore Heritage Mile - Oakwood, 1125 Midland Hwy, Mangalore, TAS,
  • A late Georgian two storey stone house with considerable thought given to the approach and visual impact through the use of an axial driveway and flanking walls, giving the house extra dimension.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5477
    external image thumbnail.pl?rt40671 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40670 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40667


3. Milford House , 1708 Midland Hwy, Bagdad, TAS
Visit  'Armytage House'
Visit 'Armytage House'

  • (1830) (B. R. Johnson)
  • Classified but removed from National Estate listing - on the Mangalore Heritage Mile

  • Milford Manor was built by George Armytage in the 1830”s. It is built of sandstone block in the Georgean style of architecture.
    • Although George Armytage was granted 500 acres at Bagdad in 1817 it wasn’t until around 1822 that he and his wife moved to his Bagdad property. Michael Howe the bushranger visited the farm and stole $300 worth of goods.
    • Milford Manor was also known as “News Inn,” which was visited by Cash the bushranger in 1844, but he failed to find $500 hidden there.
  • Armytage kept “The Saracens Head” hotel which was situated nearby. By 1847 Milford estate consisted of 4,000 acres and numerous buildings.
  • external image Milford-Manor2-2.jpgexternal image Milford-ManorL-2-3.jpgexternal image Milford%252C%2BBagdad.jpgexternal image Milford%2Binterior%252C%2BBagdad.jpg
  • A fine two storey ashlar stone Georgian house.
    • Armytage House and its smaller neighbour Milford Manor were built of local sandstone and hand made bricks and mortar.

  • The buildings, with simple lines and consummate craftsmanship, remain a lasting legacy to the unknown masons who created them for George Armytage in the 1830's. Unfortunately unsympathetic restoration has dramatically reduced Milford Manor's significance. This includes the removal of the kitchen wing and the front bell cast verandah and the addition of new roofing and guttering.
    • Armytage House is a superb renovation of the 1830s barn that used to store the grain for Milford Manor. The manor is long gone but the sandstone and handmade-brick walls of the barn enclose honey-coloured polished floors, a timber staircase and mezzanine loft bedroom in this luxury country hideaway.Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5473
  • Read more: www.armytagehouse.com.au/history/; http://www.bagdadtashistory.com/

4. Cornelian Hill, 1358 Midland Hwy, Bagdad, TAS

  • Classified
  • A two storey Georgian house built of Brighton stone. Four panel door with sidelights.
  • external image Cornelian1.jpgexternal image Cornelian2.jpgexternal image Cornelian3.jpg
  • This Georgian convict sandstone house was probably built in stages starting around 1837 with four main rooms - two living rooms downstairs with two large bedrooms and a smaller room above.
    • Next, two wings were added which formed a central courtyard, on one side was a kitchen and dining room, while on the other, two more rooms.
    • Finally the building was enclosed and roofed over to create an additional living room downstairs and a wide central hall with large, beautifully proportioned bedrooms above.



  • It is unclear who actually built the house but the original grantees (as trustees) of 275 acres were Thomas Reynolds (of Bay of Fires) and William Hodgson (of Richmond). They were both farmers. Unusual deep planning form. Read more about Bagdad
    • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5478

5. Sayes Court, 1552 Midland Highway BAGDAD TAS
  • Classified but Not Australian Heritage listed
    external image YsGJ6weoj5xlFYTgEpz29LSWNiKPcCArdnL1GKCDTV-6Eds0VxlmD0flDtbz053WYOoK13p1voPXnPyP0Ldq6bZOFsDYWxhvquEiAc56jSthu_0hhE-OXNmPFtL4WdNeY4AQOk-xR3bbkrU8TsCd3ZypAeYMJoGbAOLeUZSLzxaik00F30i_qfOSgMEg6aCVhR4XMbMOzfuiYo8cNqMnKgoEeVUcXmw6Z0x43HhjIHrpdc-EIlMcjAWVyZ6E5t11v3LyvIjL-RUYYOjaELSyxvnHCtjsrazbZarznVTseRty3nx7SlLhORXvAP3m8ukuPK63SRAA2q59tfUiS2LlRk6MPUX0GU03s_9vSS112eUJmJmnM7oNKkrYaPw0rpJq52efsg6tnPz0qhaUwCzxZtaG7AjkSaga0BVbcduu-mU-Ho3bx8Wso-Nx1GVN06APiV5nN_zfX9-f2GgmywWnrgaY0akT5WFRjjzrJQLinw8wOciTFUZ68djNleTNuPHLC967jQp9QdGOpYA3a_mF9S6_ZsfZH1TnP9PoyOrKwjqtu4DaRxUd-SJlKLCkMF4V4P8uYGt_2SB6JzvL6-8wuIy5LqxlAUKSXVeSAkcLwsmwmoz2gw=w140-h86-noexternal image 0yXTMerb_378fe53iB_8eImLWw36kdXUHZG6sYrHKS3ku6SXpvnxs6yzsDbvTG3JZWcNdVSYM-fKMOD6-BDPif-UdFS0T0PmLfme7As8X--OdBS4OOJ_iJs0_1eKBnWymd7eFSaOaox7ijd-mCaQqZwLYdr03TF3XHEJw8c1f67DgsMA2hsbKlQwi054e99Ynvp1KDjkpFD7-zBy6WIOf_iY-fBk1trOaFgkaEpSys2T9dv3CgapLuzdttXwFd8kwXMgqs9Iua7ioNzpUDtW_CsuEMzHDvFwpW9iH2zw5Gg7rLH1ELcDZ4wtAVhWOCQc0XFJsj_tqwHz1op3Ui7c_i_ngqN0jrQmdiWGrYVgKVtMT5pkxiydX70GpHC7yMT6A9zIWmDo3pFe_Yg902mout2fWHmwX5tAD5cYt21zy61PvhAuakFamwWguClM7-3iEGwNUZ7aj9TQrczh8ApViuXX4rV0aNUVkZbOen4FozSWMOHJM_QgkLOD4xpnCMck_780oHlEqGi5CAOYROwDogko3FG4VmQX_4O8L3vD8pzrRAEJfVuTVZIBAsMer5tnAM7DhL43W2S4ittsGxbmssFVYISwo04TC1s6fH3lgJeGA5osYw=w140-h79-no

6. Sayes Court Barn - Hanging Chimney,

  • Classified but Not Australian Heritage listed
  • The freestone barn at Sayes Court, Bagdad, on the Hobart to Launceston road, Tasmania, where Carl Diehl and some of his family were employed from their arrival in Hobart in July 23, 1855.
  • external image Bagdad___Sayes_Court.jpgexternal image Sayes%2BCourt%2BBarn%2BBagdad.jpg
  • Just opposite Bagdad railway station is Sayes Court, the residence of Mr. Robert Chalmers. Many a traveller must have noticed the picturesque stone out-building, with its gables, tall chimney, and shingled roof.
    • Just at this spot the valley narrows, and the creek, the orchard levels, and wooded hills, together with the buildings themselves, have attracted more than one artist, among such being Mr. Norman Lindsay.Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5379
  • Read more: History of Sayes Court by Geoff Chalmers; Publisher: [Bagdad, Tas.] : G. Chalmers, [2005]

7. Milford, 76 Goodwins Road, Mangalore TAS 7030 (1828) (Goodwin)

  • Classified but Not Australian Heritage listed
  • Home of GOODWIN, Anthony Alfred (Tony). 24.12.1926 - 16.12.2014
Dating back to the 1830s there is a full property history available including previous owners, infrastructure works undertaken and farm activities all recorded.
  • The immaculate homestead has been completely refurbished by the current owner from top to bottom. Sale listing and photographs
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5377external image 29833203_01_x.jpg
external image 29833203_10_x.jpgexternal image 29833203_03_x.jpgexternal image 29833203_02_x.jpgexternal image 29833203_07_x.jpg

8. Shene Stables, RA 76 Shene Rd, Pontville, TAS

  • Classified
Settlers included men such as William Kimberley and Gamaliel Butler, were granted large tracts of land in the Bagdad area.
  • By 1835, Butler had cleared several hundred acres of land for cultivation and built the first phase of a grand sandstone homestead which would later be called ‘Shene’.
  • The Butler family were keen hunting and racing enthusiasts, which is reflected in the massive and very elegant neo-Tudor stables at Shene which to this day form a landmark on the Midlands Highway.
An outstanding and unique stone stables contrived by Francis Butler and his father Gamaliel Butler as a romantic, picturesque composition.It is a notable example of a Victorian Gothic building influenced by pattern books, which makes a memorable impact in the landscape.
  • external image thumbnail.pl?rp03634 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03634a
  • Two-storey stone stables which have a romantic picturesque composition: iron roof with three transecting gables; narrow two pane windows; arched openings to ground floor, lancet openings to upper floor.
    • The octagonal tower of three levels contains a stone circular staircase. There are grouped chimneys on the east side and many small gables over each opening to the upper floor. There is an adjoining two-storey rectangular stone barn. Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5554
  • See the article on the Shene Stables here;




9. Woodburn, (Woodbourne) House 1007 Midland Highway PONTVILLE 7030.

  • Registered but Not Australian Heritage listed
    "At the beginning of the ‘Mangalore Heritage Mile’, Thomas New ran the ‘Crown Inn’, a commodious two storey stone inn with ample stabling for the numerous horses travelling the highway."
    • This place has strong meaning for the community because it demonstrates aspect of Victorian Georgian society and it contributes a sense of history and built character to the rural landscape.
    • Woodburn House is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a one storey Victorian Georgian domestic building and associated cottages.
    • These characteristics are found in the external form, construction methods and the detailing, both externally and internally.
      external image 564l81_47op_m.jpgexternal image Crown%2BInn.jpgexternal image Woodburn%2BHouse%2BMangalore.jpg



Description: A symmetrical, two storey, ashlar sandstone building with a corrugated iron hipped roof, boxed eaves, and corniced chimneys.
  • The panelled door is central to the front elevation and has a rectangular transom light.
    • It is under a portico supported by four plain columns. There are two windows to either side of the door, and five to the first floor. The side elevation has two windows to each floor. All the windows have moulded architraves and are double-hung with twelve panes.
  • There are two single storey buildings to the side and rear of the main building, with hipped roofs and double-hung windows with twelve panes. A further building is a row of conjoined cottages of ashlar sandstone, each with a central door under a simple portico and with an 8-paned casement window to each side.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian
    • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5474

10. Former Congregational Church, and Cemetery

  • 2 Chauncy Vale Road Bagdad 7030, (Blackburn), Registered
  • A converted church offering contemporary living.
    • external image Church%2B2%2BChauncy%2BVale%2BRoad%2BBagdad.jpgThis building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the community's sense of place. This building is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian church.

    Description: This is a simple sandstone church building with a gabled roof with parapet gable ends and paired lancet windows. The corners had diagonally opposed buttresses with peaked caps and there is a small entry foyer. The site includes a cemetery.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5380

11. Mangalore Farm (Barn),

  • 292 Blackbrush Road MANGALORE 7030, Registered
  • The barn is of historic cultural heritage significance because of its association with the general community as a local landmark. The barn and outbuilding are of historic heritage significance because of their ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of Old Colonial Georgian brick agricultural outbuildings.
    • Description: The barn is a large brick structure with sandstone base and quoins, iron gabled roof, a loft and central barn timber doors. The granary is a smaller hipped roofed structure with a sandstone base and stuccoed walls.
    • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    The ‘Mangalore farm’ is of historic cultural heritage significance because of its association with the general community and is considered a local landmark.Tasmanian Heritage Register #5471

12. Hoare's Corner (shop and stable),

  • Registered

13. Wybra Hall, 1091 Midland Highway MANGALORE 7030

  • Registered - on the Mangalore Heritage Mile
Restored Wybra Hall
Restored Wybra Hall
A family holidaying in country Tasmania in 1988 was looking for a place to turn the car around when they saw the tower of a huge Federation building. They fell in love with the grand and scruffy 24-room house, deserted after being used as an institution for wards of state.
  • Two years later, Wybra Hall and its daunting renovation was theirs.
Slow down and admire Wybra Hall; it was built about 1905 for Alfred Taylor Hart - the tower is nearly 60 ft high, the house was fully piped for gas and has a heart-shaped driveway. Hart died suddenly soon after the house was completed.
  • Wybra Hall is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a two storey brick Federation Queen Anne rural homestead..
Description: This two storey brick building is in the Federation Queen Anne style.
  • The hipped roof is covered with tiles, and there are four chimneys.
  • The symmetrical facade consists of two bay windows, there are also bay windows at the sides of the building.
  • There is a two storey returned verandah sheltering all sides, this is partially infilled on one side..
  • The verandah is decorated with cast iron brackets and panels and the posts are ornately painted. There is also a three storey high tower. Arched windows feature throughout the house.
ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Federation Queen Anne
  • Wybra Hall is significant as a Federation rural homestead based on the economic prosperity on the mining industry in Tasmania.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register Place ID #5476
  • external image Wybra%2BHall_5cf171f0ec.jpgexternal image Wybra%2BHall%2BDSC03704-Version-2.jpgexternal image Wybra%2BHall%2Bin%2BMangalore%2Bwas%2Binitially%2Ba%2Bprivate%2Bresidence%2Bin%2B1860%2Btasm_020214-8.jpgexternal image Wybra%2BHall%2Btn_wybra2.png


Only on the Tasmanian Heritage Register

  • Also on the Tasmanian Heritage Register

14. Hopevale, 38 Hopevale Road Mangalore 7030 TAS

  • Hopevale is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Federation Queen Anne domestic building.
  • 'Hopevale' is a weatherboard house with a projecting gabled roofed section featuring a bay window with three double hung mullioned window.
    • The primary hipped roof features a large dormer window with cant windows on its sides and a flat metal canopy.
    • The return verandah features a decorative timber valance.
    • There is also a sandstone barn, in a ruinous state, associated with this site.
    • Tasmanian Herigage Regsiter #5472

15. Hilton Cottage

15 Quarrytown Road Bagdad 7030
Permanently Registered Southern Midlands Council
  • This is a small timber cottage with a hipped roof, narrow boxed eaves and double hung windows. There is a timber verandah over an offset door and a skillion addition to the rear. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian
  • Tasmanian Herigage Regsiter #5382

16. Sunnyside

RA 1657 Midland Highway Bagdad 7030
Permanently Registered Southern Midlands Council
  • Sunnyside is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Old Colonial Georgian domestic building.
  • This is a timber building with a central door and flanking double hung windows with a verandah over the front. To one side of the building is a lean to addition whilst on the other side is a skillion addition. There are also several early additions to the rear of the building.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
  • Tasmanian Herigage Regsiter #5383

17. House RA 11 Eddington Road Bagdad 7030

  • Permanently Registered Southern Midlands Council
  • This building is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Victorian Georgian domestic building.
  • This is a weatherboard cottage with a central door and flanking double hung windows. There is a verandah over the front facade and the roof is hipped with narrow boxed eaves. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian
  • Tasmanian Herigage Regsiter #5384

18. Chauncy Vale

RA 345 Chauncy Vale Road Bagdad 7030
  • Permanently Registered Southern Midlands Council
Nan Chauncy in 1959, feeding an orphaned wombat.
Nan Chauncy in 1959, feeding an orphaned wombat.
Chauncy Vale house, circa 1914, outbuildings, garden and associated structures are significant as a picturesque writers home and retreat evidencing an alternative lifestyle in Tasmania after the Second World War.

Chauncy Vale house, circa 1914
Chauncy Vale house, circa 1914

    • The Chauncy Vale house and garden is strongly associated with Nancy Chauncy, an Australian childrens novelist who achieved wide readership and literary recognition in Australia and overseas, including a number of awards.
  • Nancy Chauncys association with the house was from 1914 to 1970, initially using the house as a meeting place for guides, then as her weekend retreat, as her marital home and later as the site where her many novels were written.
    • Nancy Chauncy is commemorated by the Childrens Book Councils quin-quennial Nan Chauncy Award for childrens literature.
    • The community interest in the conservation of Chauncy Vale house and its garden as a place that illustrates the life of Nancy and Anton Chauncy and its use as an educational resource is significant as evidence of community values.
    • Chauncy Vale house
      Chauncy Vale house
    • Description: The Chauncy Vale house was built circa 1914 and was originally a two roomed, single storey cottage formed from slip-form concrete, concrete block and weatherboards with a corrugated iron roof over original shingles.The house has four paned glass windows. It is internally lined to dado level with Tasmanian Oak and features a sandstone fireplace. An externally raised north-facing deck overlooks the garden and valley.
    • A kitchen and bedroom extension was built in the 1950s and includes a laundry and bathroom area. The site includes outbuildings including a toilet, dog kennel, a garage and shed and a beehive.
      • A cave and some stone carvings are also located on the site and associated with Nan Chauncy.
      • Tasmanian Heritage Register #5385


2. Elderslie and Broadmarsh

1. Broadmarsh Post Office (1832) 1175 Elderslie Rd, Broadmarsh

  • Classified as 'The Mansion', also known as Stonyhurst Estate
    external image Old%2BPO%2BBroadmarsh%2BIMG_1372A.jpg
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03631a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03631
Built by pr John Pearson Rowe & named Stonyhurst estate. A picturesque example of a Gothic Revival house built about 1845.
  • The two and three storey stone house has a separate kitchen wing and a detached stable-coach house.
  • The building is notable for its consistently pitched steep gable roofs and is the focal element of the small hamlet of Broadmarsh.
A two and three storey sandstone Victorian Georgian house.
  • Separate two storey kitchen wing. Detached stables and coach house.
  • Each steeply gabled section is symmetrically designed - windows have small pane Georgian windows.
  • Quoins and windows surrounds expressed. Iron roof.
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5392

2. Strathelie (1851) RA 974 Elderslie Road Broadmarsh TAS

  • Classified - Strathelie & Outbuildings
external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03630b
Strathelie at Broadmarsh. Picture: Jocelyn Chapman
Strathelie at Broadmarsh. Picture: Jocelyn Chapman

A very impressive late Georgian house built in 1851 of silver grey sandstone, featuring a parapeted facade, enclosed rear courtyard, fine front door and front verandah with slender iron columns.
  • The house is complemented by particularly fine outbuildings comprising stone barn with arched openings and brick stable forming a u-shape about a central yard. Intact and in good order.
Symmetrical two storey Victorian Regency house. Silver grey sandstone. Parapet partly conceals hipped roof.
  • Four panel door with half sidelights and eliptical fanlight. Twelve pane windows. Articulated quoins.
  • Enclosed courtyard at rear with single storey service wing.
external image Strathalie%2BTasmania%2BIAA_47f.jpgexternal image Strathelie%2Bstable%252C%2BElderslie%2BRoad%252C%2BBroadmarsh.jpgexternal image Strathelie%2Bstables%252C%2BElderslie%2BRoad%252C%2BBroadmarsh.jpgexternal image Strathelie%2BNorthern%2Bwall%252C%2BElderslie%2BRoad%252C%2BBroadmarsh.jpg
Strathelie & Outbuildings
  • At front, first verandah with slender iron columns. Stone and brick outbuildings (stable and barn) form u-shape about yard. Arched openings to stone barn.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #5390

3. Somerset (1830) RA 1236 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh TAS

  • Classified
    Somerset is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of an Old Colonial Georgian weatherboard rural cottage with associated outbuildings.
    Description: This is a weatherboard house with extensions to three sides.
  • The original form and detailing of the house is still apparent behind the extensions.
  • Windows are multi-paned and there is a brick chimney.
  • There is also a late Victorian timber shed and an early Victorian sandstone barn/stable.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian

    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5400

4. Arndell, RA 37 Andersons Road Elderslie 7030

  • Classified
Arndell is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the growth and development of the convict system in colonial Tasmania.
  • Arndell is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a two storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian building.
    Description: The main heritage item is a two storey rural stone barn or stable building that has had a section of it demolished following a fire.
    It was originally a two storey hipped roof building with casement windows.
  • It appears to have been divided into three sections with the two storey section that remains standing being a workers cottage of some kind. There is a small fireplace on the upper floor.
    Half of the building has now been demolished to one level with a skillion covering it.
  • A carved stone inscription over the central section reads "Lt. W. Gunn 1845".
    • The house at the front of the property is c1920s and also contributes to the rural landscape.
    The rear of this house has thick sandstone walls and was probably an earlier kitchen building incorporated into the house.
    Between the house and the barn/stable structure are the archaeological remains of a brick structure, possibly a house.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5427

5. Invercarron (1842), 1290 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh

"In 1842 Invercarron became the site of the Broadmarsh Convict Probation Station. At the end of 1844 there were 240 probationers, possibly including some from Norfolk Island, in Broadmarsh, which was deemed to be such a disaster [La Trobe’s 1847 report cited ‘utter abandonment of all order and decency’] that it was closed in 1847, and the Probation Station system began to wind down from that time."
  • This building is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of an Old Colonial Georgian sandstone probation station with its associated outbuilding.
external image invercarron2.jpg
external image Invercarron%2B-%2BSite%2Bof%2BBroadmarsh%2BProbation%2BNS3195-1-4784%2524stream.jpg
  • Description: This building was originally three bays wide with a central door, and was added to with a Victorian wing on the south side. The windows are small paned double hung and the door of six panels. The corrugated iron roof is hipped.
    • There is a verandah to the front and returning to the north side. The verandah has a corrugated iron roof and timber posts.
    • Chimneys to the house are brick. The stable is a gable roofed structure with sandstone walls, corrugated iron roof sheeting, central door opening and flanking 12 paned double hung windows.
    • There are also the remnants of a well further down the paddock.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #5395

6. Valleyfield, 120 Hamilton Road NEW NORFOLK 7140

  • Classified
  • A large estate in Tasmania, 1911 : Valleyfield, 9,800 acres, Epping, John Taylor, unimproved.value., £10,769; capital.value., £15,000.
    Comprising "Valleyfield", house, cottages, kiln and convict prison (1822), coach house and gardens
  • Featured in Country Houses of Tasmania, pp 190-197
external image thumbnail.pl?rt42247 external image thumbnail.pl?dig005040external image thumbnail.pl?dig005080 external image thumbnail.pl?rt42248 external image thumbnail.pl?rt42255

An outstanding group comprising a fine Colonial home, built 1822 as the Kings Head Inn and licensed until 1834, and outbuildings.
  • The outbuildings comprise a fine stone prison, stone coach house (1830) and hop kilns including one circular brick kiln built in 1884 by R.W.G. Shoobridge.
  • The buildings are complemented by a fine garden comprising mature European trees and have a fine riverside setting in the highly modified agricultural landscape.
Valleyfield [1] [picture] / [John Richardson Glover]
Valleyfield [1] [picture] / [John Richardson Glover]
Valleyfield [2] [picture] / [John Richardson Glover]
Valleyfield [2] [picture] / [John Richardson Glover]
external image valleyfield_then.jpg
external image valleyfield_now.jpg
Valleyfield - circa 1880
Valleyfield - now
Valleyfield & Outbuildings, 120 Hamilton Rd, New Norfolk, TAS
external image 9781741756524.jpg
The Valleyfield homestead is one of the oldest buildings in New Norfolk. Built as a single storey brick house, the shingled roof extends to a traditional verandah with columns.
external image New%2BNorfolk%2B-%2B%2527Valleyfield%2527.%2BNS3195_1_3792.jpgexternal image New_Norfolk___Valleyfield.jpgexternal image Valleyfield%2Brt42249-27753.jpegexternal image Valleyfield%2Brt42250-2347.jpeg
  • Valleyfield, located in New Norfolk in the picturesque Derwent Valley of Tasmania, was the birthplace of Australia's commercial hop industry.
  • The historic town of New Norfolk, 33km NW of Hobart, was pioneered around 1808 by Norfolk Island free settlers.
Valleyfield homestead, built and licensed as the Kings Head Inn in 1822, became the first place in Australia to successfully produce hops commercially under irrigation in the 1850s.
  • Robert Shoobridge, the grandson of William Shoobridge who helped pioneer hop growing in Tasmania, took over Valleyfield estate in the 1870s, producing an annual apple crop of 40,000 bushels.
  • Hops and orchards were the mainstay of this property, and the Derwent Valley region, until the 1970s. The district produces still most of the hops used by Australian breweries, although the main industry in the region today is paper manufacture.
    Read more about Valleyfield, New Norfolk in Country Houses of Tasmania (Allen and Unwin, Sydney 2009, new ed 2012)
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #1251

7. School House (1858), Black Brush School 592 Elderslie Road, Elderslie

external image 6308146934948103569

Registered

  • Black Brush School is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian school building.
  • Description: This is a sandstone cottage with a central door and flanking double hung windows. The windows feature semi circular heads and the door has a top light over. The roof is hipped with narrow boxed eaves. The sandstone work is ashlar coursed.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5389

8. Congregational Church, then Uniting Church RA 1497 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh


external image %2528former%2529%2BCongregational%2BUniting%2BChurch%252C%2BBroadmarsh%2BDscf4570.jpgexternal image %2528former%2529%2BCongregational-Uniting%2BChurch%252C%2BBroadmarsh%2BDscf4563.jpgexternal image %2528former%2529%2BCongregational-Uniting%2BChurch%252C%2BBroadmarsh%2BDscf4568.jpgexternal image Congregational%2BChurch%2BBroadmarsh.jpg
  • Registered
  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. This building is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a sandstone Old Colonial Georgian church.
  • Description: This is a simple sandstone church building with a gabled roof with parapets at the gable ends. The windows are pairs of lancets and there are buttresses on the sides of the building.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5393

9. St. Augustine's Church (1851) 1457 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh

external image ST%2BAugustine%2BBroadmarsh.JPGexternal image St%2BAugustines%2BAnglican%2BChurch%252C%2BBroadmarsh%252C%2BTasmania%2B1.jpgexternal image St%2BAugustines%2BAnglican%2BChurch%252C%2BBroadmarsh%252C%2BTasmania%2B3.jpg
  • Registered
  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. St. Augustines Anglican Church is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a sandstone Old Colonial Gothick Picturesque church building.
  • Description: This is an early sandstone church with a gabled roofs with gabled parapets either end, buttresses to the sides and tall lancet windows. There is a small vestibule at one end and an chancel at the other of a smaller scale than the body of the church.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Gothick Picturesque
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5394

Only on the Tasmanian Heritage Register

10. Allwright family Vault Elderslie Road (Off), Elderslie

  • The Allwright Family Vault is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a late Victorian burial vault.
  • Description: The Allwright Family Vault is located in the middle of a paddock, above the Elderslie Rd and Clifton Vale Rd Junction. It is sandstone in construction with raised casket featuring ornate vases on sides and a flat top. There is a second smaller vault next to this.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Academic Classical
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5431

11. Blackbrush RA 558 Black Brush Road, Elderslie

  • Black Brush is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian rural cottage with its associated timber shearing shed.
  • Description: This is a single storey (with attic) sandstone house with modern additions to the front and rear. The original structure has casement windows and a half gabled roof.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5428

12. Brooklyn RA 1206 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh

  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. This buildings is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Victorian Georgian domestic building.
  • Description: This is a small weatherboard cottage with a gabled roof, verandah to the street, a central door and flanking double hung windows. The verandah posts feature timber brackets.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5398


13. Cottage RA 621 Elderslie Road, Brighton

  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. This building is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Victorian domestic building.
  • Description: This is a single storey weatherboard cottage with a projecting hipped roof from a main hipped roof. The projecting section has a bay window and timber detailing. There is a verandah over the main entry door that features timber detailing.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #631

14. Kellie Clifton Vale Road, Elderslie

  • This site is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. Kellie is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a group of sandstone Old Colonial Georgian farm buildings.
  • Description: The main house is sandstone building with a central door and large flanking double hung windows facing away from the road. This is surrounded on all sides by lean too additions dating from the mid 1800s to the present. There are two early farm buildings both dating from the earliest period of the property, a barn of a floor and a half and a stable of a floor and a half both with gabled roofs and sandstone walls.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5430

15. Leeswood RA 1242 Elderslie Road, Broadmarsh

  • Leeswood is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian cottage.
  • Description: This is a single storey sandstone cottage with a corrugated iron hipped roof. Symmetrical in form, it has a central front door with 12-paned sash windows, with moulded surrounds, on both sides. There are chimneys with moulded tops at both ends of the cottage, and there are expressed quoins to the corners.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5397

16. Royden 58 Clifton Vale Road, Elderslie

  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its landscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place. Roydon is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a sandstone farm house and stable in the Old Colonial Georgian style.
  • Description: This is a sandstone farm house with a central door and flanking double hung windows, an attic level and weatherboard addition to the rear. The building has a hipped roof and narrow boxed eaves. The sandstone stables feature a half hipped roof, sandstone walls and an iron roof. The building is a floor and a half and is still in use as a stable. There are some other early buildings on the site.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #5429

3. Pontville Village


In the 1830’s Pontville was laid out on the banks of the Jordan River and quickly became the major settlement in the area overtaking Brighton, well placed as it was at the new bridge crossing, on the main road to Launceston.
external image Georgian%2BBuildings%2Bof%2BPontville.jpg
  • The area around Pontville was first explored by Europeans in early 1804 and by 1806, with serious food shortages in Hobart Town, expeditions of soldiers were being sent into this area to kill kangaroos and emus.
  • It is claimed that during one of these expeditions Private Hugh Germain, a well educated member of the Royal Marines, started giving various local sites exotic names.
  • Thus, only a few kilometres north of Pontville, lies the incongruously named village of Bagdad and Pontville is actually situated on the banks of the equally incongruously named, Jordan River. It is said that Germain travelled through the area with a copy of The Bible and the Arabian Nights and delighted in giving places names like Jerusalem, Jericho, Jordan, and Lake Tiberius. In fact the headwaters of the Jordan River rise in Lake Tiberius before flowing through Jericho.
    Read More: On the Convict Trail: Pontville

By the 1820s there was a small settlement at Pontville but the real development of the village occurred in the 1830s and 1840s when it took over from Brighton and became a major centre for the district and an important traveller's stopping point on the road between Port Dalrymple (Launceston) and Hobart.
  • Within a relatively short period, Pontville boasted a courthouse, gaol, watch house, barracks, churches, inns and some large private residences.
  • During the 1830s to 1850s, a number of large homes for the wealthier landowners were also constructed in the surrounding area, including properties such as
    • Marlbrook, Milford, Oakwood and Shene in the Bagdad Valley,
    • Strathallan and Torwood at Tea Tree, and Stoneyfield and Arndell at Broadmarsh.
    By 1858 there were 258 buildings listed in Brighton, predominantly residences, as well as a number of churches and schools.
external image PH30_1_594-c.jpg
PONTVILLE – FROM THE POST OFFICE LOOKING SOUTH. DATE UNKNOWN, COURTESY OF THE TASMANIAN ARCHIVE AND HERITAGE OFFICE. NO PH30-1-594
Pontville was developed on land which was originally owned by William Kimberley.
In 1838 this land was sold and a number of important buildings - the Police Station (1839), the Courthouse (1842) - were constructed.
  • By the mid 1840s the town was thriving with a population of over 2000 people.
  • By the 1860s there were six flour mills operating in the area.
  • Although the town's growth occurred in the 1840s many of the old buildings predate this period of development.
  • Pontville became the seat of local government when the Brighton Municipality was declared in 1863.
  • During the 19th Century, smaller communities grew around Bridgewater, Tea Tree, Dromedary, Old Beach and Broadmarsh.
    The main road through the district that sustained many of the towns.[1]
Georgian Buildings of Pontville, TAS, illustration from 'The Country Towns and Villages of Tasmania' p.35
Georgian Buildings of Pontville, TAS, illustration from 'The Country Towns and Villages of Tasmania' p.35
  • East Side of Pontville


1. The Barracks (1824) now 'The Row' Main Road, (Midland Highway) Pontville
  • Classified
  • An early stone barracks building erected adjacent to the Jordan River crossing at a focal position in this historic village.
  • Its long row appearance is due to a later matching addition.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rt27939 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40672 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40673 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40675
  • The building is essential to the townscape of Pontville.
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #10848

2. 'Lansdowne', 4 Glebe Street, Pontville

external image thumbnail.pl?rp03632
  • (Mr Jim Sydney)
  • Classified
  • A single storey Victorian Filigree stone house built about 1879 and notable for its return verandah with fine timber detailing.
  • The house has a dominant hillside location and is essential to the townscape of historic Pontville.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #647


3. St Mark's Church and Butler family graves, Midland Highway, Pontville

  • Classified
  • St Mark's Church of England
  • A very unusual Romanesque church built in 1839-41 to a design of convict architect James Blackburn from very finely tooled local white freestone.
  • external image Pontville3.jpgexternal image Pontville6.jpgexternal image Pontville-St-Marks.jpgexternal image Pontville2.jpg
  • St Mark's Graveyard and Butler Family Graves, Midland Highway, Pontville
  • The church at the northern end of the town, makes an essential contribution to the townscape of Pontville.
  • external image Pontville-117_edited-1.jpgexternal image Pontville-118.jpgexternal image Pontville-115.jpgexternal image Pontville-119.jpg
  • Historic graveyard contains several Butler family graves.
  • See much more about St Mark's Church of England here
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #658

4. 'The Shieling' Cottage (1819)Queen St, (Midland Highway), Pontville, TAS

  • Classified
  • also known as 2 Rifle Range Road, Pontville
  • Featured in the ABC Program "Who's been sleeping in my House?" Monday, 19 December 2011: Episode 5: The Sheiling
  • external image main.jpgexternal image sheiling1.jpgexternal image sheiling2.jpgexternal image sheiling3.jpg
    • Located on the original road heading north from Hobart, The Sheiling was originally two conjoined dwellings.
  • The Colonial Georgian building is constructed from locally quarried sandstone, and features upper dormer windows and a truncated roofline. There is a large central stone chimney, with fireplaces on the ground and first floors of both dwellings.
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #10858

5. Bridge Piers

external image Bridge%2BPiers%2BDSC02425.JPG
Registered
This bridge is old for an Australian bridge, and although the deck is new, the massive nature of the piers, together with their fine detailing means that the bridge has retained much of its original character. Read more: On the Convict Trail: Jordan Bridge
  • The Bridge at Pontville is of historic heritage significance as a rare example of a sandstone bridge from the first half of the 19th century.
  • Less than 20 of these bridges survive from that period around Australia.
  • The Bridge at Pontville is of historic cultural heritage significance as an early sandstone bridge able to demonstrate a degree of technical and creative achievement (1848).
The bridge is also able to demonstrate the growth and development of transport and communication in colonial Tasmania.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #653

6. Stone Cottage (Old Forge, Shepherd's Cottage) 2 Glebe Street Pontville TAS

  • Registered
external image Shepherd%2527s%2BStone%2B%2BCottage%2BPontville.jpg
2 Glebe Street is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian conjoined house.
  • Description: This is a single-storey conjoined sandstone cottage with an iron gabled roof and single chimney. The facade features 12-paned sash windows and transom lights to both front doors.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #645

West Side of Pontville

In the mid-1840, Pontville was an important staging point for travellers on route between Hobart and Launceston (Port Dalrymple).
Pontville was also a major supplier of stone for the whole of the southern region and boasted a population of more than 2000 residents.
By the 1860s, there were no fewer than six flour mills operating in the area.
  • Today Pontville offers a glimpse into Tasmania’s colonial past with magnificent sandstone buildings, many headstones, a cosy inn, historic accommodation and accessible heritage

7. The Epsom Inn (1835) 244 Midland Highway, Pontville

  • Registered
Epsom House, just outside Hobart in Tasmania, is one of Australia’s hundred oldest houses.
  • 'Epsom' (c. 1835) has been variously known as 'The Castle Inn and Brighton Hotel'.
external image Epsom_House_old-world-garden-wedding004.jpgexternal image Epsom_House_history2.jpgexternal image epsomhouse%2B%25281%2529.jpgexternal image Epsom_DSC0223.jpgexternal image Epsom_House-History.jpg
Epsom Inn is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a two storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian house.
  • Description: This is a large two-storey stone building with an iron hipped roof. The facade features a central portico with flutedTuscan columns.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
Description: This is a large two-storey stone building with an iron hipped roof. The facade features a central portico with flutedTuscan columns.
  • Concerts in the Ballroom at Epsom are part of a tradition stretching back more than 150 years:
  • The superb acoustic means you hear every note. Musicians love the honest sound and the connection with the audience so we have no shortage of performers.
  • Epsom House Website: Tasmanian Heritage Register #652

8. The Old Post Office (Officers' Mess, Antique Shop)

  • Classified
    268 Midland Highway, Pontville, TAS
  • A typical Georgian stone building basically intact. Formerly a post office and originally an officers' mess.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rt27940external image Pontville%2BDSC02404.JPGexternal image The%2BOld%2BPost%2BOffice%2B%2528Officers%2527%2BMess%252C%2BAntique%2BShop%2529%2BPH30_1_594-c.jpgThe building standing right on the present road alignment is an essential part of the historic character of Pontville.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #10852

9. 'Brooksby' 284 Midland Highway, Pontville. TAS,

  • Classified
    Brooksby, Pontville is a two storey stone Georgian house built about 1840.
external image thumbnail.pl?rt27942external image %2527Brooksby%2527%252C%2BPontville%252C%2BTasmania%252C%2Bbuilt%2Bc.%2B1832%2Bp19ga_3sa1_m.jpgexternal image Pontville___Brooksby.jpgexternal image 1p92os1_3sa4_m.jpg
  • It is thought that Brooksby was built just before St Mark's Church of England opposite, and early church services were held in the stone stables.
  • It was built for Lt GB Foster, assisstant police magistrate in the district and with its fine garden is an important element of the historic town of Pontville.
    Read much more about Brooksby here;
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #659

  • Prince Street

10. Three Single Storey Cottages

  • Registered
external image Prince%2BSt%2BCommandants%2BCottage%252C%2BPontville.jpgexternal image Prince%2BSt%2BCottage%252C%2BPontville.jpgexternal image Prince%2BSt%2BCottages%252C%2BPontville.jpgexternal image 3%2BMarlborough%2BStreet%252C%2BPontville%252C%2BTasmania.jpg
The sites 104-year administrative use contributes to the significance of the site at a regional and local level by demonstrating and being directly associated with the human occupation and evolution of the area.

Prison Commandants Cottage 8 Prince Street, Pontville
  • This single-storey stuccoed building has a bell-cast roof over a verandah on two sides. There is a separate sandstone rubble stable with an iron hipped roof, casement windows and timber lean-to. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Vernacular
  • The Constables quarters, including a 50ft by 10ft sleeping room, day room of similar size with small kitchen and storeroom (PWD 266/1616 TSA). Further details of the complex can be gleamed form an enquiry into the areas 1893 railway disaster (The Mercury 26/Sept 1893 p.3 C6). The report noted a single entrance through a narrow doorway, over which there was carved "Pontville Watch House 1839".
Three other dwellings, plus ruins probably associated with the complex are also still standing, which together offer tangible evidence to Pontvilles historical administrative precinct.
  • To the rear of the Prince Street dwellings are several ruins and unidentified foundations, including a chimney. An 1880s photo of the southern gaol wall shows the unidentified ruin of a stone structure, possibly connected with the gaol.

Pontville Sites only listed by the Tasmanian Heritage Register:


11. Craiglea, 1 Glebe Street, Pontville

  • Craiglea is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a two storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian rural homestead.
    external image 1%2BGlebe%2BStreet%252C%2BPontville%2BTAS%2B7030%2B1.jpg
external image 1%2BGlebe%2BStreet%252C%2BPontville%2BTAS%2B7030%2B2.jpg
  • Description: This is a two-storey sandstone house with iron hipped roof, 12-paned windows to the upper storey, and 24-paned windows with jalouises to the lower storey. The verandah is supported by slender iron columns with cast-iron brackets and shades a central four-panel front door with transom light. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian


12. Shepherd's Cottage, 2 Glebe Street, Pontville

  • Registered
external image Shepherd%2527s%2BStone%2B%2BCottage%2BPontville.jpg
2 Glebe Street is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian conjoined house.

  • Description: This is a single-storey conjoined sandstone cottage with an iron gabled roof and single chimney. The facade features 12-paned sash windows and transom lights to both front doors.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
    Tasmanian Heritage Register #645


13. Former Anglican Rectory, 265 Midland Highway, Pontville

  • The former Anglican Rectory is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial Georgian house.
  • external image Former%2BAnglican%2BRectory%2B265%2BMidland%2BHwy%2BPontville%2BTAS2.jpgexternal image Former%2BAnglican%2BRectory%2B265%2BMidland%2BHwy%2BPontville%2BTAS.jpg
  • Description: This is a single-storey sandstone building with an iron gabled roof, 12-paned windows, half sidelights and transom to the main entry and verandah with vertical timber balustrades. The attic dormer to the rear appears to be a later addition.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Regency

14. St. Matthews Roman Catholic Church and Cemetery 195 Midland Highway, Pontville

  • This early colonial sandstone church demonstrates skill in the design and detailing of the stone work and the technical acheivement of its construction .
  • St Matthews Roman Catholic Church is of historic cultural heritage significance because of its association with the community as a religious and townscape landmark.
  • St Matthews Roman Catholic Church is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a Victorian Academic Gothic sandstone church.
  • external image St%2BMatthews%2BChurch%252C%2BPontville.jpgexternal image St%2BMark%2527s%2BChurch%2Bof%2BEngland%2B%25281839-1841%2529%2Bon%2Bthe%2Bhill%2Babove%2Bthe%2Btown%2Bimg_1374a.jpg
  • Description: This stone church in the Gothic Picturesque style has an iron roof, entry porch with parapeted gable and sandstone bellcote. There is a group of three lancet windows to the front of the church. Buttresses divide bays with single lancet windows to the sides and plate traceried windows with quatrefoils to the rear. The churchyard includes a cemetery.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Academic Gothic

15. Turnkeys Cottage, 3 Marlborough Street, Pontville

  • Turnkeys Cottage (a recent name) faced the entrance gate to the goal yard and is likely to have been the Watch House Keepers Cottage and two smaller dwellings in Prince Street.
  • Turnkeys Cottage is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey sandstone Old Colonial cottage.
external image 3%2BMarlborough%2BStreet%252C%2BPontville%252C%2BTasmania.jpg
  • Description: This single-storey brick house with 12-pane sash windows has an iron bell-cast roof over the verandah on two sides.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian

16. Uniting Church. RA 247 Midland Highway, Pontville

  • This church is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a sandstone Victorian Rustic Gothic church.
  • Description: This is a Victorian Gothic church of sandstone construction. It has a steeply-pitched gabled roof clad with corrugated iron. There are a group of three lancet windows set within one end of the main gable section. Sandstone butresses are located at the corners of the main structure. There is a sandstone entry porch with steeply-pitched gabled roof. A cemetery connected with this church is located on the opposite bank of the Jordan River.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Rustic Gothic


4. Lower Broadmarsh

17. Jordan House and Stable,

  • RA 622 Elderslie Rd, Lower Broadmarsh (Brighton), TAS
  • An impressive late Georgian house of near square plan and built of mellow convict bricks with sandstone trimmings.
    The house and its adjacent stone stable are intact and in good condition, standing close to the road and providing a good contribution to the landscape.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629b external image thumbnail.pl?rp03629

18. 'Stonefield' formerly 'Braeside', 266 Elderslie Rd, Lower Broadmarsh (Brighton), TAS, Australia

  • (1824) Classified
    A good example of a two storey Georgian stone home with a separate kitchen wing (now incorporated into house).
  • Built in 1824, the house is well sited in the landscape.
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03628 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03628a


5. Tea Tree Road, Brighton TAS
During the 1830s to 1850s, a number of large homes for the wealthier landowners were also constructed in the surrounding area, including properties Strathallan and Torwood at Tea Tree, and Stoneyfield and Arndell at Broadmarsh.

19. Maiden Erleigh, 451 Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree TAS

  • Classified
  • Single storey stone house with hipped roof with boxed eaves. The front has a central timber door with fanlight and large 12 pane windows either side. Glassed in addition at rear.
  • "That fine Agricultural and Dairy Farm situated at the Tea-Tree Road, Brighton, known as "MAIDEN ERLEGH". Containing 730 acres, of which 350 is first class agricultural land now under cultivation, and divided into convenient sized paddocks; the balance is fine grazing land. The whole property is conveniently fenced and well watered by the Strathallan Rivulet.
  • Stone homestead, seven rooms, barn, stable, and other necessary out-buildings. This farm is most admirably situated, being close to the Tea-Tree siding and Brighton Junction railway station, and within easy distance of Bridgewater sale yards."

20. Strathallan, 503 Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree, TAS 7017

  • Classified
  • Strathallan is a property at Tea Tree. It was originally granted to Nathan Elliott. (from Alex Green)
    • Nathan Elliott arrived in Van Diemen's Land on 11th October 1819 per the "David Shaw". Elliott was granted 700 acres at the Tea Tree Brush. By April 1837, Elliott had accumulated grants of 395 acres in the parish of Drummond, 736 acres in the parish of Jarvis and 10 acres at Brighton.
    Elliott commenced construction of the Strathallan homestead in the 1830's, and it was complete by 1842.
  • Single storey stone house with hipped roof with boxed eaves and return verandah on three sides.
    The front has 3 bays separated by pilasters, a central 4-panel timber door with fanlight and half sidelights and large 12 pane windows either side. Includes stone barn and stables.
    • Elliott expanded his property to also include the neighbouring Maiden Erleigh. By 1862, the property comprised 1,130 acres.
      George Finlay purchased the property later (he owned it in 1903), followed by the Tunks.
      The Tea Tree Memorial Hall was built on land donated by the Tunks family.
      Jim Thompson is the current owner.

21. Willowbrook Farm, 555 Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree TAS

  • Classified
  • Timber house on stone foundations with hip roof and boxed eaves with attached bulllnose verandah. The front has a central timber door with fanlight and windows either side with half glassed wall on verandah side. Ashlar stone gable roof barn from original house.

22. Woodlands (1844), Tea Tree TAS

  • Registered
    external image thumbnail.pl?rp03636 external image thumbnail.pl?rp03636a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03636c external image thumbnail.pl?rp03636b
  • A significant early residence of 1842 and two stone cottages.
    Single Storey, sandstone, with three attic rooms. Constructed between 1839 and 1842 in the Georgian, English Colonial style. Two original sandstone cottages also intact. Original land grant to Valentine Griffith (1823).
  • "Woodlands" built between 1839 and 1842, has remained in original condition, the present owners progressively renovating the property. "Woodlands" has been held by only three families - the Valentines until 1865 when it was sold to Joseph Barwick. It remained with this family until acquired by the present owners in 1981.

23. Rosewood, 945 Back Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree TAS

  • "Rosewood" C1830 Registered

external image main.jpg
external image image9.jpg
external image image2.jpg
This two storey sandstone rendered house is in the Victorian style. It has an asymmetrical front with a projecting two storey wing (with bow window). The hipped roof is covered with corrugated iron, and there are three chimneys.
  • Part of the facade is sheltered by a two storey verandah that is decorated with cast iron brackets and panelling. The windows are mostly double hung and single paned. There are three outbuildings, two are of weatherboard construction, the other is sandstone.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian
  • Historic heritage listed "Rosewood" on 2.509 hectares (approx) is a substantial 2 storey Victorian/Georgian home owned by only one family for the past 48 years. "Rosewood" originally comprised some 2500 acres and was built by early British transportee John Clarke between 1817 and 1832, further extensions to the original sandstone home were completed around 1890 and 1910.
  • Heritage listed outbuildings comprise a large timber coach house, old bakery with sandstone oven, smokehouse and stables. "Rosewood" was originally capable of producing 120 bales of wool a year but now reduced considerably in size, produces pinot noir, chardonnay and riesling wines from their vineyard as well as a productive olive grove
  • Daddy Baker's Creek is located at Rosewood in Tea Tree, in the Coal River Valley wine region of Southern Tasmania.
    It is owned by Jane & Graeme Gangell. Their son runs his own vineyard near-by.

24. Eastwood, 739 Middle Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree TAS

  • Registered
  • Owned by Richard Keith Norman, descendent of the Eastwood founder, Reginald K. Norman

  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place.
  • Eastwood is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard Victorian domestic building and associated dairy.
    Description: Eastwood is a single storey weatherboard building with a gabled roof, attic window and a verandah to three sides.
    There is a single storey sandstone and gable roofed dairy attached.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian

25. Torwood (1836), 610 Middle Tea Tree Road, Tea Tree TAS

  • Registered
  • This building is of historic heritage significance because its townscape associations are regarded as important to the communitys sense of place.
  • Torwood is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey brick Old Colonial Georgian domestic building.
    Description: It is a single storey brick building with a hipped roof, double hung windows, moulded architraves and quoins. There is a verandah with timber posts to three sides of the building and a weatherboard addition to the rear. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian



6. Old Beach

26. 'Tivoli' and Barns (Gagebrook) off Old Beach Road, Old Beach

An intact single storey Victorian stone house built about 1880. It is a focal building in the countryside.
external image thumbnail.pl?rt40676 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40677 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40681 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40678 external image thumbnail.pl?rt40679
  • The property was restored by the Housing Department in the mid to late 1980s to be community offices but fell into disrepair.
  • The current owners have restored the property and it is in very good repair. They have also restored the name to reflect the original name of John Gage's property: Gagebrook.
  • The two barns were burned down some time before the current owners purchased the property.

27. St George's Church of England, 2 Briggs Road Gagebrook

  • Classified
    external image St%2BGeorges%2Bold%2Bbeach.JPGBuilt on 1 acre of land donated by J. F. Gage which had been part of the 407 acres owned by his father, John Ogle Gage and known as “Gagebrook”,
    • J.F.Gage had bought it at public auction for 1,854 pounds after the death of his father who had lived at Old Beach since 1824.
  • The church, as originally built, was a rectangular wooden building with a stone foundation and it measured almost 10 by 5 and a half metres.
  • It had a gabled roof clad with split timber shingles and supporting a cross at each end.
  • There was a small porch at the back end of the northern side which also had a gabled roof. The doorway and windows were of Gothic design. The latter had attractive mullions and were glazed with plain glaze which was later frosted.
    • Within the church, the architecture and finish was very simple and typical of that in many small country churches. The church was lined with tongue and groove pine boards commonly used at that time. The floor at the eastern end was raised to a height of one step. There was seating for about sixty persons.

    Like a number of churches in Tasmania, the church was named after St. George, the patron saint of England.

  • Behind St. George’s Church there is a small cemetery. This was consecrated by Bishop J. E. Mercer when he visited Old Beach on the 31st. January 1912 although the cemetery had been in use before this date.
  • Most of the graves in the cemetery are for members of pioneer families in the district such as the Clearys, Gages, Mollineaux”, Newmans, Purdons and Richmonds.
    In 1914 a chancel was added to the eastern end of St. George’s Church in memory of Frances Gage, nee Howells, a parishioner who died on the 31st. July 1909. She was the wife of J. F. Gage. Stone quarried at “Baskerville” was used in the construction of the chancel.

28. Roman Catholic Church,

  • Registered
Not sure if this picture is this church
Not sure if this picture is this church


29. Granny Charles' Cottage, or is it: Purdonville 359 Baskerville Road, Old Beach TAS

  • Registered
  • external image Purdonville%2B359%2BBaskerville%2BRoad%252C%2BOld%2BBeach%2BTAS%2BPH30_1_1488.jpgThis is a sandstone cottage with a central door, flanking double hung windows and a hipped roof with narrow boxed eaves and a single dormer window.

  • The verandah on the street facade has hipped ends and single posts featuring decorative timber brackets.


Also Listed by Brighton Council

30. Uniting Church and Cemetery 37 Briggs Road Old Beach Tas

  • Registered
external image Uniting%2BChurch%2BGagebrook.jpgThis is a small sandstone church with a gabled roof and eaves and bargeboards at each end.
There are two blind lancet windows in the front facade and a central door with a lancet top. There is a small lancet vent in the peak of the gable end. There are two windows down the side of the building and an addition to the rear. The churchyard contains a cemetery.


7. Bridgewater

31. The Lodge, Midland Hwy, Brighton, TAS, Australia

  • Classified
A very original integrated cottage and outbuildings group comprising stone cottage and generally timber outbuildings.
  • external image thumbnail.pl?rp03635a external image thumbnail.pl?rp03635
The group is basically intact and a scarce remaining example of Colonial vernacular architecture in Tasmania.

32. Cottage - Cobb's Hill Road
  • Classified
33. St Mary's Church of England 20 Old Main Road, Bridgewater TAS
  • ClassifiedSt. Marys Anglican Church is of high historic cultural heritage significance because of its strong and special association with the general community as a religious landmark. It also has a strong and special association with the Anglican community due to their religious beliefs.
    Description: A small rural church built in the Old English Gothic style. It is intact in almost every respect and is an excellent example of the style. The site also includes a graveyard.
    ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Academic Gothic
  • Read all about it at On The Convict Trail: St Mary's Church, Bridgewater

34. Parkholm, RA 288 Midland Highway, Bridgewater
  • Registered
Parkholm is of high historic cultural heritage significance for its ability to illustrate the historical and sequential development of agriculturist pursuits and land in the outlying districts.
  • Parkholm is of historic heritage significance because it represents the principal characteristics of a Victorian Georgian rural homestead, its construction method, design, fabrication and operation.
  • Description: A farm group of buildings including main house and outbuildings. The main house is two storey with a surrounding verandah. There is a single storey section to the rear with a hip roof.
  • It is located on a brow of a hill and is surrounded by mature trees. ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian

35. Bridgewater Bridge, Esplanade, Bridgewater


  • Ashlar sandstone abutments and piers for original 1849 timber bridge.
  • The Bridge is the most recent of a number of river crossings at Bridgewater and with 1874 bridge abutments and 1893 bridge remains comprising a steel caison and turntable, it demonstrates the evolution of river crossing technologies at the site. The Bridge is an important element in a cultural landscape showing the construction and evolution of public and commercial river crossing infrastructure since the 1830s.
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #618

36. Bridgewater Bridge & Remains. Midland Hwy, Bridgewater


  • The Bridge is the most recent of a number of river crossings at Bridgewater and with 1874 bridge abutments and 1893 bridge remains comprising a steel caison and turntable, it demonstrates the evolution of river crossing technologies at the site. The Bridge is an important element in a cultural landscape showing the construction and evolution of public and commercial river crossing infrastructure since the 1830s.
  • The Bridge is a surviving example of a series of innovative structures attributed to
  • Sir Allan Knight, the Chief Engineer of the Tasmanian Public Works Department. The 1893 bridge remains are associated R.D Miles, City Engineer of Hobart.

Also Tasmanian Heritage Register listed:

37. Coronation Hall, Old Midland Highway, Bridgewater

  • Brighton Scout Hall is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a weatherboard Federation public hall building.
  • Description: An unusual single storey weatherboard building with a combination gable, a pair of projecting hipped roofs and half timber decoration in gable end. On each of the projecting hips, which are either side of a covered entry, there is a fixed window of three squares high. There is a diamond motif with a vent in it in the centre of the gable end.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Federation Free Style
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #625

38. Cottage, 25 Sorell Street, Bridgewater

  • 25 Sorell Street is of historic heritage significance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a weatherboard Victorian Georgian domestic cottage.
  • Description: A early weatherboard cottage with two doors to the street and three windows. It has a hipped roof with no eaves and a skillion to the rear. The weatherboard walls have no paint and are heavely weathered.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian Georgian
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #621

39. Cottage, 21 or 32 Weily Park Road, Bridgewater

  • A cottage of historic heritage significance because it is representative of a modest Victorian timber cottage in a rural setting.
  • Description: A small timber cottage located next to the Bridgewater Sports Grounds. It features a central door and flanking windows with a hip roof over.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Victorian
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #623

40. Fairfield, formerly Hayfield, 14 Esplanade, Bridgewater

  • Fairfield is of historic heritage signifcance because of its ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of a single storey weatherboard late Victorian domestic building.
  • Description: This is a single storey weatherboard house with a protruding wing to the side, central door, flanking double hung windows and a side return verandah with slender posts and cast iron brackets.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Late Victorian Domestic
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #617

41. Genappe, RA 50 Boyer Road, Bridgewater

  • A two storey vernacular Georgian farm house built from brick. It has a centrally placed door with flanking windows and is three bays wide.
  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Old Colonial Georgian
  • Formerly home of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. K. Pitt
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #620

42. Parkview, 11 Weily Park Road, Bridgewater


external image f-D6h8j6h-mlMWgsSh4aqDs1pz-YkxVsJL_ygPmXi_QwB0HKk-Ntg8NDmjJKLrdxD8X18Sg39gnlXLsy0dVgvMrIHd09GyxuyONe4fR1b9pqH-ornlzuozVWLKyFXL5AIlNbWd66xTc2dZsa8PemMYbRdN-zq6eG211lH72bHM3zGSfUx25ktRaMFWtCWFbRNVKjuJcGj8gBXLoz8656m2rNJi61VWB4AnVuvcrChe9ci6MTQqle9LNFqCBhHokFKT_in_RfOKfWcBYy1MkNonY7Y_w20rKCn9Aptr4kG9f1dcdAGkShuq96iJIAyKlMwJiOjpIG-Ru3CadVTXzXcme3_FKYOTM9sHyCn2xvwBJsH7gWqY41EU33bte-1jfm4ax0RgeWmR-uW2Bd6GZXgKoHIPcgYvqKBggh6uxIFWGsJ1w5VUmf0ZTKmmbfDhNpkuPiR_Vk155uAtBX1Gy6vNppUJUk9VxYfuRKWWEFp7vbfDRHkHkTgYUYU-KoLU4bZ3Y7D-ODBowurkMXq22MRGA6A58zEhSh-yNFpKHL6_UcDpYrDgvxEmi3z4UPwe_Hwzaoz4e8lF5PAVn0HWbASVo0bf7XfBpx=w843-h569-no

  • Parkview is representative of a late Victorian timber domestic building in the rural context.

  • Description: A house with a projecting gable out each side and a verandah between. It is detailed with paired columns on the verandah and finials on the gable ends.

  • ARCHITECTURAL STYLE:- Federation Queen Anne

  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #622



  1. ^ Joint Land Use Planning Initiative – Stage 2 Heritage Management Plan Prepared for the Brighton, Central Highlands, Derwent Valley, and Southern Midlands Councils as part of a project managed by Pitt & Sherry Pty Ltd together with Parsons Brinckerhoff: