Haberfield Federation Arts and Crafts influences


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Federation Arts and Crafts

- From Wikipedia

The Arts and Crafts style came out of a movement to get away from mass-production and rediscover the human touch and the hand-made.

The architectural style was widely used in Australia during the Federation period and was characterised by

Add to this the Arts and Crafts roof:

Windows are typically cottage style, with multiple small panes of glazing set in side-hung casements.

William Morris's 1859 Red House in London - The UK Arts & Crafts movement spanned over a period of around 30 years and spread across much of the UK, reaching its height in the early 20th century. The look is all about simple, traditional building forms
William Morris's 1859 Red House in London - The UK Arts & Crafts movement spanned over a period of around 30 years and spread across much of the UK, reaching its height in the early 20th century. The look is all about simple, traditional building forms

'Craignairn' in Wahroonga is an example of what is generally categorised as a “Federation Arts and Crafts” style house.  Craignairn, named after a house in Scotland, is a major domestic architectural work by Howard Joseland. It was built in 1909
'Craignairn' in Wahroonga is an example of what is generally categorised as a “Federation Arts and Crafts” style house. Craignairn, named after a house in Scotland, is a major domestic architectural work by Howard Joseland. It was built in 1909

Haberfield developer Richard Stanton's own Arts and Crafts House, The Bunyas: (1906 – designed by John Spencer-Stansfield)
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For Sale 2012, The Bunyas, one of Sydneys finest Federation properties, 5 Rogers Avenue, Haberfield NSW
Rear view of 'The Bunyas' 1-5 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, off Parramatta Road
Rear view of 'The Bunyas' 1-5 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, off Parramatta Road

8 Rogers Avenue Haberfield
8 Rogers Avenue Haberfield


11 Rogers Avenue Haberfield
11 Rogers Avenue Haberfield

12 Deakin Avenue Haberfield
12 Deakin Avenue Haberfield


3 Boomerang Street Haberfield
3 Boomerang Street Haberfield

1. Rough-cast walls

  • Pebble dash is a form of rendering where pea shingle or stone chippings are thrown onto sand and cement base.

  • Roughcast is crushed stone mixed with cement and applied to walls.
  • Arts & Crafts or Tudorbethan style homes used pebble dashing as a design feature.
  • External walls were red brick at the lower end and pebble dashed above. The wall surface was often left unpainted.
    -
    http://www.freepedia.co.uk/DIRHomesPebbledash.php
  • In Australia, the use of pebble-dash is minimal, but rough-cast is widespread
Rough-cast upper wall
Rough-cast upper wall

Pebble dashing in 1920's English Houses
Pebble dashing in 1920's English Houses

Arts & Craft Rough-cast
Arts & Craft Rough-cast

Rough-Cast in Haberfield:

19 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 2012-071-TN.jpg
19 Stanton Road

12 Denman Street Haberfield Spring 034-TN.jpg
12 Denman Street

56 O'Connor Strret Haberfield Spring 050-TN.jpg
56 O'Connor Street

12 Deakin Avenue Haberfield Spring 099-TN.jpg
12 Deakin Avenue

51 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 058-TN.jpg
51 Stanton Street



2.Shingles

The wooden Shingle style is an American architectural style made popular by the rise of the New England school of architecture, which disliked the highly ornamented patterns of Queen Anne architecture.

(Painted wooden) Shingles in Haberfield:

62 O'Connor Street Haberfield Spring 048-TN.jpg
62 O'Connor Street awning

44 Dalhousie Street Haberfield Spring 024-TN.jpg
44 Dalhousie Street Awning

10 Denman Avenue Haberfield Spring 032-TN.jpg
10 Denman Avenue Gable

57 Dalhousie Street Haberfield Spring 047-TN.jpg
57 Dalhousie Street Federation style California Bungalow (rare)

34 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 081-TN.jpg
34 Ramsay Street (Heritage listed)

Roslare, 34 Ramsay Street heritage listing

Statement of significance:

A fine example of the Queen Anne style of architecture, probably designed by D Wormal, Richard Stanton s architect for the Haberfield Estate. It is an unusual design and exemplifies the high standard that Stanton prescribed for houses in the Estate.
The property was also occupied by the one family for most of its life.
Description
Physical description:

Arts and Crafts influences are also clear:
  • the rough-cast chimneys,
  • faceted bay window, with rough-cast below
  • 'cat-slide' roof,
  • low eaves and
  • shingle decoration above the bay window.
The competent design of this house suggests that it was the work of an architect, probably D Wormal, Stanton's architect for the external image 34%2520Ramsay%2520Street%2520Haberfield%2520Spring%2520081-M.jpgHaberfield Property Company. It is a fine single-storeyed brick residence designed in the Federation Queen Anne style of architecture. The facade brickwork is tuck-pointed.

The hipped roof is slate, trimmed with terra cotta including crested ridges, and has exposed rafter feet. To one side a bay projects towards the street, with a roughcast base and an ample six-light bay window surmounted by a shingled gable having a decorative panel-and-batten apex.

The windows have casement sashes and bullnose sills. The chimneys are roughcast with brick decoration. The unusual verandah has a skillion roof which continues down from the main roof plane. The verandah has elegant paired brackets and paired posts supported on piers rising from inverted-arch balustrade bays, and a tiled floor.

3.Faceted Bay Windows

Faceted window: any window which has a number of ‘faces’, which are joined by silicon. For example, a bay window usually has three facets.
Faceted Bay Window.jpg



Faceted Bay Windows in Haberfield:

10 Denman Avenue Haberfield Spring 032-TN.jpg
10 Denman Avenue

44 Dalhousie Street Haberfield Spring 024-TN.jpg
44 Dalhousie Street

19 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 2012- 073-TN.jpg
19 Stanton Road

3 Boomerang St Haberfield in Spring 049-TN.jpg
3 Boomerang Street

7 Boomerang St Haberfield 044-TN.jpg
7 Boomerang Street



4. Stone bases

The Red House, in Bexleyheath, London , designed for Morris in 1859 by architect Philip Webb, exemplified the early Arts and Crafts style, with its well-proportioned solid forms, wide porches, steep roof, pointed window arches, brick fireplaces and wooden fittings. Webb rejected the grand classical style and based the design on British vernacular architecture expressing the texture of ordinary materials, such as stone and tiles, with an asymmetrical and quaint building composition.
Note that the bricks used in 1859 would have been hand-made, with mass-production starting in the 1880's leading to a boom in brick housing.
  • The Arts & Craft Movement was influenced by medieval craftsmanship: believing that one craftsman should make an item from start to finish and only using local materials.
  • The principles of Arts and Crafts design would encourage houses to be erected (albeit in mass-produced brick) above a stone base using local sandstone:
2 Crescent Street Haberfield 065-TN.jpg
2 Crescent Street

7 Boomerang St Haberfield 044-TN.jpg
7 Boomerang Street Haberfield with Magnolia

8 Crescent Street Haberfield 074-TN.jpg
8 Crescent Street

57 Boomerang Street Haberfield 02-TN.jpg
57 Boomerang Street

Spring arrives at 53 Dudley St Haberfield 023-TN.jpg
Spring arrives at 53 Dudley St



5.Tall Chimneys

In English Arts and Crafts, asymmetry, dominant chimneys and high roof pitches with low eaves are the keys
  • Arts and Craft housing chimneys were, for all their finery, merely smoke vents.
  • Modern designed chimney-stacks are an alternative to power-hungry air-conditioning, being used for sustainable ventilation.
16 Deakin Ave Haberfield 102-TN.jpg
Derrylyn, 16 Deakin Ave

27 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 2012- 070-TN.jpg
27 Stanton Road

71 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 085-TN.jpg
71 Ramsay Street

Haberfield Spring 045-TN.jpg
10 Denman Avenue

3 Denman Avenue Haberfield Spring 025-TN.jpg
3 Denman Avenue


Derrylyn, 16 Deakin Avenue, Haberfield, NSW 2045

Statement of significance:

Derrylyn, built in 1910, is a large single storey federation cottage of two-tone bricks with a fine slate and terracotta roof punctuated by numerous tall roughcast chimneys.
The building is prominently sited on the corner of Dalhousie Street and Deakin Avenue, Haberfield. It retains many of its original features. (Heritage Council Branch Managers Report 29 July 1983)

Description
Physical description:
Derrylyn is a large single storey federation cottage of two-tone bricks with a fine slate and terracotta roof punctuated by
Derrylyn, 16 Deakin Avenue, Haberfield, NSW 2045
Derrylyn, 16 Deakin Avenue, Haberfield, NSW 2045
numerous tall roughcast chimneys.
Derrylyn was built in 1910.

An Interim Conservation Order was placed on Derrylyn on 11 December 1981 at the request of the vendor who was concerned that future owners of the property may propose internal and external changes to the house.

With the agreement of the new owner a Permanent Conservation Order was placed over the property on 2 December 1983.

In 1983 through the Heritage Assistance program funding assistance was provided to erect a new picket fence.

On 2 April 2000 the property was transferred to the State Heritage Register

6. A high pitched roof

A British modern thatched cottage
A British modern thatched cottage

Right: Thatch is used occasionally on new UK dwellings and demands a roof pitch of at least 45°, and more likely 50°, to allow the rain to flow off quickly and prevent ingress. This steep pitch is also an essential ingredient of cottage style.
  • With a pitched roof in a traditional house – especially if it is in Arts & Crafts style – it is essential to have a steep pitch.
  • To underline this, many house designers quote Sir Edwin Lutyens — probably the most famous of British architects, revered for the quality of his country houses. Lutyens hated 45° pitches. He referred to 45° as “the ugly angle”. Most traditional architects today will avoid that pitch when designing houses, and if you ask them why, a good number will say it’s because it does not conform to the Golden Ratio. A slightly steeper pitch will achieve a much more satisfying result.

  • “My favourite when designing an Arts & Crafts house is 51°,” says Richard Cutler. More often than not he has to use 48° in order to meet the demands of planners. “However, this is far better than 45° and my style is to sweep the roof down low over the eaves and reduce the height of the outer wall in the upper storey rooms,” he says. The effect of this is to emphasise the roof.
    from http://www.homebuilding.co.uk/design/design-guides/design-style/arts-crafts

131 Dalhousie Street Haberfield 053-TN.jpg
131 Dalhousie Street

106 Kingston Street Haberfield 079-TN.jpg
Arts and Craft 106 Kingston Street

27 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 2012- 070-TN.jpg
27 Stanton Road

59 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 079-TN.jpg
59 Ramsay Street

20 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 078-TN.jpg
20 Ramsay Street


7. Overhanging eaves

34 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 081-TN.jpg
34 Ramsay Street

4 Crescent Street Haberfield 066-TN.jpg
4 Crescent Street

10 Crescent Street Haberfield 073-TN.jpg
10 Crescent Street

61 Boomerang Street Haberfield 01-TN.jpg
61 Boomerang Street

7 Denman Street Haberfield Spring 036-TN.jpg
7 Denman Avenue


8. Windows and Doors

Small-paned casement windows
Small-paned casement windows
131 Dalhousie Street Haberfield 053-TN.jpg
Dormer Window at 131 Dalhousie Street

20 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 078-TN.jpg
Bullseye window at 20 Ramsay Street Haberfield

71 Ramsay Street Haberfield Spring 085-TN.jpg
71 Ramsay with Arched Windows

Dormer Windows

  • Dormer windows may be pitch roofed (gabled), or catslide roof (mono pitched). - choose small-paned casement windows.

Feature Windows

36 Dalhousie Street Haberfield Spring 009-TN.jpg
Bullseye at 36 Dalhousie Street

38 Dalhousie Street Haberfield Spring 2012-011-TN.jpg
Arched window at 38 Dalhousie Street

51 Stanton Road Haberfield Spring 058-TN.jpg
Bullseye at 51 Stanton Road

  • Unusual-shaped windows, or a series of small windows, may be used to add interest to an elevation.
  • Examples include circular windows, trefoil or quatrefoil windows (three lights or four lights), heart-shaped windows (there is at least one in Sydney), or a series of three small square windows.
  • Use Art Nouveau designs in leadlight windows

Beautiful arched window at 40 Dalhousie Street (heritage listed)
Beautiful arched window at 40 Dalhousie Street (heritage listed)

Residence, Woodrow Vale Easton (C 1920); Waratah Rest Home (1941-61)

40 Dalhousie Street, Haberfield, NSW 2045

Statement of significance:

A handsome and ample residence on a large site. It is a distinctive design in the Federation Arts and Crafts/Queen Anne style of architecture. It also has an interesting history and associations.
Physical description:
    • This substantial house is a single-storey brick building, an eclectic design in the Queen Anne/Arts and Crafts styles of architecture.
    • Facing east to Dalhousie Street, its front is almost symmetrical, with two gable wings flanking a verandah and another at one end, and projecting from the main gabled roof.
    • Each gable has a decorative apex panel. The roof has terra cotta tiling with crested ridges and gable terminals. The brickwork is tuckpointed and has roughcast render above door head height.
    • A casement bay window is in each gable wing.
    • A handsome four-light arched window faces the verandah, beside the front door.
    • The verandah has a slightly lower-pitched roof, tiled floor and paired timber posts with decorative timber brackets.
    • The chimneys are roughcast, the front one emphasising the verandah corner.
  • Row casement windows at 106 Kingston Street
    Row casement windows at 106 Kingston Street

Window and Door Openings

  • Windows are typically set back deep within their reveals, often by 100mm, creating depth and shadow to elevations.
  • Plank doors are typical of Arts & Crafts houses. They could be in painted softwood, or quality timber such as oak, left natural or stained and oiled.
    • A wide front door with solid proportions suits the style well.
    • Black hand-forged ironmongery is an ideal choice.
    • Other options include traditional panelled doors, perhaps with some of the upper panels glazed.
    • Glazed French doors are a typical feature at the rear or sides, providing access onto a terrace or the garden.
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