Gothic Style and Queen Anne Federation style

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Classic Gothic Style


external image 250px-Reims_Kathedrale.jpg
Façade of Reims Cathedral, France
external image 250px-Cath%C3%A9drale_de_Reims_int%C3%A9rieur.jpg
The interior of the western end of Reims Cathedral

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Gothic Malbork Castle (formerly Mareinburg), Poland, begun before 1280

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American Victorian Gothic house

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American Queen Anne with Gothic features

Gothic architecture is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe. It is also the architecture of many castles, palaces, town halls, guild halls, universities and to a less prominent extent, private dwellings.
Tthe Gothic style was expressed most powerfully in the great churches, cathedrals and in a number of civic buildings, its characteristics lending themselves to appeals to the emotions, whether springing from faith or from civic pride.
  • From Wikipedia on Gothic Revival Archictecture:
    "The Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or Neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time."
  • By the late 1800s, the fanciful details of Gothic Revival architecture had waned in popularity. Gothic Revival ideas did not die out, but they they were most frequently reserved for churches and large public buildings.
  • Queen Anne became an architectural fashion in the 1880s and 1890s, when the industrial revolution was building up steam. Home builders were caught up in the excitement of new technologies which allowed cheap factory-made, pre-cut architectural parts, especially bricks and tiles. - Queen Anne Architecture in the U
external image 166px-Rheinstein_crop.jpgRheinstein Castle, Germany
showing fortress towers and castellation of the walls


external image 152px-Kosciol_mariacki_krakow.jpgBasilica of the Assumption of Mary, Krakow, Poland
showing finials above towers


external image 175px-552SienaPalPubblico.JPGThe Palazzo Pubblico, Siena, Italy
showing castellation of roof line


Gothic influences on Queen Anne decoration:

Gothic Towers

Castle in Prague
Castle in Prague

Albert Park Architecture by Dean-Melbourne
Albert Park Architecture by Dean-Melbourne
TV Star: Architect John Horbury Hunt designed Camelot  at Camden in the late 1880's
TV Star: Architect John Horbury Hunt designed Camelot at Camden in the late 1880's

Castellation of roofs

Castellation- Battlements used for a decorative purpose.
Castellation- Battlements used for a decorative purpose.
Clovelly House, 1 Drummoyne Avenue, Drummoyne
Clovelly House, 1 Drummoyne Avenue, Drummoyne
Castle building: balcony and castellation
Castle building: balcony and castellation
Ridge castellation at 25 Drummoyne Avenue, DRUMMOYNE NSW
Ridge castellation at 25 Drummoyne Avenue, DRUMMOYNE NSW

Circular Windows


Chartres Cathedral Rose Window (above)
Chartres Cathedral Rose Window (above)

external image 220px-Rozeta_Pary%C5%BC_notre-dame_chalger.jpg
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Symbolism- the north rose of Notre Dame, Paris

'Bullseye' leadlight window at 23 Drummoyne Avenue, Drummoyne
'Bullseye' leadlight window at 23 Drummoyne Avenue, Drummoyne

Coloured Glass paned window sets


Inside the Chartres Cathedral, France
Inside the Chartres Cathedral, France

Small coloured glass panels in the upper window transoms are typical Federation features
Small coloured glass panels in the upper window transoms are typical Federation features

Leadlight glass
external image 120px-Koeln-Hohe_Domkirche_St_Peter_und_Maria-Zentrum_des_Chorobergadens_mit_Koenigsfenstern.jpgexternal image 135px-Graz_Leechkirche_20061105_adjusted.JPG
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Haberfield leadlight door and windows

(Left)The windows of the choir of Cologne Cathedral, (early 14th century)
(Right) Crucifixion with Ss Catherine, George and Margaret, Leechkirche, Graz, Austria



Pair Of Backlit Gothic Stained Glass windows
Pair Of Backlit Gothic Stained Glass windows
Web-Randwick-eve038.jpg
Coloured glass sash windows

Web-Randwick-eve022.jpg
Coloured Patterned Glass Verandah window

Gargolyes and Roof Ornaments


gargoyles atop The Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington, KY.  Twenty-six gargoyles to be exact, all carved in Italy
gargoyles atop The Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington, KY. Twenty-six gargoyles to be exact, all carved in Italy
Ramshorn finial
Ramshorn finial

Gargoyle in form of a lion Cathedral Saint-Etienne de Meaux
Gargoyle in form of a lion Cathedral Saint-Etienne de Meaux
roof-with-arrows.jpg
Ramshorn finial over left gable and on hipped ridge

Verandah valences


external image Ecuador_gargoyles_quito_cathedral.jpg
Charlton, near Byron Bay, showing verandah frieze and gable decoration
Charlton, near Byron Bay, showing verandah frieze and gable decoration

Ancient Gothic Church Parapet
Ancient Gothic Church Parapet

A Queenslander style house in New Farm..
A Queenslander style house in New Farm..

Neo-Gothic buildings have many of these features:

2006bb3218_rheims_cathedral_model_annotated_290x290.jpg
West front of Notre Dame Cathedral, Reims, France

  • Strong vertical lines and a sense of great height
  • Pointed windows with decorative tracery
  • Gargoyles and other carvings
  • Pinnacles

In the industrial revolution of the 19th Century, Gothic ornamentation jumped from requiring expensive hand-made detailing to much cheaper mass-produced effects. Religious influence allowed homes to mirror larger Gothic churches, family homes becoming an ideal of the family Gothic castle.
arch_styles_romanesque_revival.gif
USA Romanesque Revival Architecture with arched doors and tower arcades


Probable Gothic influences on the mass-produced Queen Anne style are:
  • conical towers (replacing steeples)
  • front-facing gables
  • ridge ornaments replacing castellation
  • finials on apex of roofs and towers
  • Ridge apex ornament substitutes for gargoyle
  • leadlight glass windows (replacing intricate stained glass) and
  • the sets of small coloured panes of glass above feature windows (as coloured highlighting)
  • bullseye window replacing the grand rose window
  • ornate gable ornament (instead of ornamented galleries or frilly barge boards)
  • gable ventilators (compare the top gable inserts in both US pictures at upper RHS)
  • bulky buttresses (to support side chimneys)
  • verandah valances and friezes as attractive pseudo-gothic ornamentation
  • arched window brickwork or arched entrance corridor

Haberfield Gothic

In 1901, Haberfield developer Richard Stanton, advertised some available house designs as being of 'domestic Gothic' style, which historian Vincent Crow describes as having a 'characteristic cone', usually on a verandah roof. [1] These are also called 'turrets' and are usually round or pyramid-shaped towers. The tall narrow towers are amusingly known as 'candle-snuffers'.[2]
8 Rogers Avenue
8 Rogers Avenue


12 Deakin Avenue
12 Deakin Avenue

14 Kingston Street
14 Kingston Street

19 Stanton Road
19 Stanton Road

19 Stanton Road
19 Stanton Road

20 Stanton Road
20 Stanton Road

20 Dudley Street
20 Dudley Street

42 Kingston Street
42 Kingston Street

78 Kingston Road
78 Kingston Road

37 Dudley Street
37 Dudley Street


Examples listed by Vincent Crow therein are:
  • 8 Rogers Avenue, Haberfield
  • 11 Dickson Street, Haberfield
  • 11 Forest Street, Haberfield
  • 14 Kingston Street, Haberfield
  • 118 Dalhousie Street, Haberfield
  • 19 Stanton Road, Haberfield (classified by the National Trust)
  • 20 Dudley Street, Haberfield
  • 21 Turner Avenue, Haberfield
  • 30 Kingston Street, Haberfield
  • 37 Dudley Street, Haberfield (classified by the National Trust)

Burwood Gothic

'Verona' 2A Appian Way Burwood-TN.jpg
Belvedere at 'Verona' 2A Appian Way Burwood

'Alba Longa' 4 Appian Way
'Alba Longa' 4 Appian Way


'Vallambrosa' 19 Appian Way
'Vallambrosa' 19 Appian Way

Capri, 23 Appian Way
Capri, 23 Appian Way

'Colonna' Burwood Appian Way
'Colonna' Burwood Appian Way

306 Burwood Road-small.jpg
306 Burwood Road

308 Burwood Rd Burwood-small.jpg
'Olmora' 308 Burwood Rd Burwood

74 Hume Highway Burwood small.jpg
Belvedere at 74 Liverpool Road Burwood

Examples from the Appian Estate Area are:
  • 'Verona' 2A Appian Way
  • 'Alba Longa' 4 Appian Way
  • 'Vallambrosa' 19 Appian Way
  • 'Capri' 23 Appian Way
  • 'Colonna' 304 Burwood Road
  • 'Talopa' 306 Burwood Rd
  • 'Olmora' 308 Burwood Rd
  • 74 Liverpool Road Burwood

Other Sydney Examples of Gothic Queen Anne:

78 Liverpool Road Burwood Heights
78 Liverpool Road Burwood Heights

Alisterbrae1.jpg
'Alister Brae' - c1904 Pymble NSW

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Carr Street Coogee

  • Leadlight and coloured 'lights'


    42 Kingston Street, Haberfield, showing both leadlight glass windows and coloured glass fanlights above, finial on pyramidal tower roof
    42 Kingston Street, Haberfield, showing both leadlight glass windows and coloured glass fanlights above, finial on pyramidal tower roof
  • Ridge Ornaments and Finials at the apex


    8 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, showing ridge ornaments and finials
    8 Rogers Avenue Haberfield, showing ridge ornaments and finials

    IMG_0355_edited.jpg
    Dudley Street Coogee showing finial and ridge decorations, arcades under gablets and decorated turret
  • Door and Window Arches
    Arched windows and brick arched doorway at Verona, 2 Appian Way, Burwood
    Arched windows and brick arched doorway at Verona, 2 Appian Way, Burwood
Alisterbrae6.jpg
Alister Brae: Grand arched entrance hall showcasing spectacular stained glass


  • Interior window arch at 37 Dudley Street, Haberfield
    Interior window arch at 37 Dudley Street, Haberfield

  1. ^ 'Haberfield - The Development of its Character, by Vincent Crow, 1978, page 8
  2. ^ 'A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture', Appperly et al, page 134