Federation Heritage in Church Street, Pymble


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Church Street, Pymble

Subdivisions leading up to 1890 anticipated the completion of the North Shore Railway line in 1890.
  • The first subdivision of McKeown’s lands, the Roseville Estate, created Roseville Avenue (now Wellesley Road), which extended north from Lane Cove Road to Church Street.
  • A second subdivision created residential lots through to Stoney Creek Road (Mona Vale Road) and from Church Street to a newly defined Hope Street.
  • The grand houses in Church Street, from 19 to 33, all heritage listed with one exception (No. 25-27), form a particularly significant group.

  • The north-western end of Church Street, and the southern side of Church Street between King Edward Street and Wellesley Road contains a significant grouping of heritage items and potential heritage items, and forms a logical extension to the gazetted Pymble Heights HCA.



Dwelling

10 Church Street, Pymble

Sold for $2,300,000 in March 2000
10 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
10 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot

Dwelling

21 Church Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920.
21 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
21 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot

Abyia

23 Church Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920.
"Abyia" An exquisitely restored c1901 Queen Anne style 2 storey residence of mansion proportions. Located in an absolute blue ribbon east side address within an easy walk to PLC, shops and the station
  • This magnificent family residence will take your breath away the moment you arrive! Nestled in 1562M of tranquil private parklike gardens enjoying wonderful vistas and a perfect rear to north aspect
  • Completely refurbished with no expense spared combining classic period features with state of the art conveniences. Return verandahs, leadlight windows, pressed metal ceilings, marble fire places, wide Kauri timber floors
  • Exceptional detailed timber work, picture rails, tessellated tiles, French doors to the outdoors and large light filled rooms. Formal lounge, sitting room, banquet sized separate dining room, home office, powder room, large family living room. Designer kitchen with granite bench tops, quality imported appliances and casual meals area
  • 4 double bedrooms (main with full en suite and dressing room), 3 bathrooms plus the childrens study. Separate from the main residence is a fully self contained 2 bedroom Guest House and double garage plus a wine cellar
Abiya, 23 Church Street Pymble
Abiya, 23 Church Street Pymble

Kierwa

29 Church Street, Pymble


Kierwa 29 Church Street, Pymble; by: R Moore, P Pike, H Proudfoot
Kierwa 29 Church Street, Pymble; by: R Moore, P Pike, H Proudfoot
external image imageDisplay?op=generateWatermarkedImageforFreemium&imageUrl=aHR0cHM6Ly9zdGF0aWMucnBkYXRhLmNvbS9ycGRhQVUvcGhvdG8vbGlzdHNhbGUvNDcweDMxMy8wNC8wNy8xOS9OU1cwMDkzMUMvNDcuSlBH&height=275&width=440The original portion of the house was built in 1894 and a major new wing was added in 1905. The 1905 Federation wing has a very high level of significance.Built for Duncan Carson. Historical period: Pre-1900. Later altered.
"Kiewa was built in two sections and is a mixture of styles. The original part of the house was basically an Australian Colonial style house with Queen Anne and Victorian elements added.
  • The round corner tower with its central roof and terracotta ornamentation was derived from the style of the High Victorian era.
  • The polychromatic effect of the painted cement bends between the red brickwork was also of Victorian origin.

  • The formal front porch with its Flemish style gable, projecting oriel window and
    carport on the western side of the house
    carport on the western side of the house
    classical detailing was however derived from English Queen Anne style.
  • Apart from these added features, the house was basically very simple in form, with a two-storey verandah running around three of the sides."

"About the turn of the century (1905) a new addition was built onto the northern side of the house.
  • This section was built in the Australian Federation style, the detailing being much simpler than that on the older section of the house.
  • It was characterised by a very large bay, with three smaller bay windows projecting from it, which seemed to balance the front façade of the house.
  • The northern veranda, which had been supported on turned timber columns with cast iron infill panels was replaced with a much heaver brick version.
  • The simple roof form and the painted bands of the old house were continued across onto the new addition, thus connecting the two sections."
29 Church Street, Pymble
29 Church Street, Pymble


"The design of the house took advantage of the elevated site with two storey verandahs providing views to the north, east and south of the residence.
The interwar period additions
The interwar period additions


The 1905 additions to the north eastern corner of the house recreated the terrace with first floor verandah described as a ‘wide sleeping out balcony’ (p6 SMH 3 October 1914).

In 1983 the house was extensively restored with a minor addition of a new kitchen and associated terrace at the north western corner of the building.

Several outbuildings north of the garage were removed and a large section of the sloping garden modified for a tennis court and pool.

The driveway was relocated, via the front setback, to a new carport within the western side of the house. To preserve the significant views from the rear northern terrace, the pool and tennis court were set down lower than the original terrace." - MEETING OF Ku-Ring-Gai COUNCIL TUESDAY, 9 AUGUST 2011 AT 7.00PM"
Hoffbank

33 Church Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1941-1960.
Hoffbank 33 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Hoffbank 33 Church Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot